Masters number 50 for Player

first_img4 April 2007When Gary Player tees off at the US Masters at Augusta on Thursday, he will be playing in the major for a record-equalling 50th time.Player will become only the second golfer to reach the magic number in the tournament, following in the footsteps of Arnold Palmer, who played it exactly 50 times.Player doesn’t want to stop at 50, however; he reckons he would love to compete in the Masters one more time in 2008.Masters victoriesHe first contested the Masters in 1957 and won it three times, in 1961, 1974 and 1978. When he won in 1961, he became the first non-American winner of the event. In the 1978 tournament, a final round eight-under-par 64 saw him come from seven strokes back to snatch a stunning victory at age 43.In recognition of the 71-year-old’s achievement, the World Golf Hall of Fame in St Augustine, Florida has been running a special exhibit, “Gary Player: A Global Journey”, that explores Player’s impact on the game through personal memorabilia, artifacts, videos and images.Jack Peter, the Hall’s chief operating officer, said the exhibit had been extremely well-received since it opened last year, “and we look forward to continuing to tell [Player’s] story.”Player was inducted into golf’s Hall of Fame in 1974.163 tournament winsDuring Player’s career he won nine majors and 163 tournaments. Jack Nicklaus, who is widely regarded as the greatest player ever, secured 18 majors and 113 titles in all, 50 wins shy of Player.The World Golf Village website quotes Nicklaus as saying: “I don’t think Gary was a great driver of the golf ball. I don’t think he was a great iron player. He was a good putter, not a great putter.“But when he really needed to be, he was a great driver, and a great iron player, and he made the putt when he needed to make it. Gary, as much as anyone I ever saw, has that thing inside him that champions have.” Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more



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You and your domestic: Rights and responsibilities

first_imgAre you a domestic worker unsure of your rights? Or an employer or prospective employer wanting to clarify your obligations to your domestic worker?A domestic worker is a gardener, driver or person who looks after children, the aged, sick, frail or disabled in a private household. (Image: Solidarity Centre)Minimum wages, working conditions, employment contracts. Here’s a quick guide to the so-called Domestic Workers Act (Sectoral Determination 7 of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act), plus all the links you need to find out more.A large portion of the South African workforce – about 1 million people, according to Statistics SA – is made up of domestic workers.Maids or domestics are an integral facet of South African life, as is the “maids and madams” relationship so successfully satirized in the well-known cartoon, Madam and Eve. In the cartoon, the traditional power balance in the maid/madam relationship is turned upside down: Eve, the domestic worker, has her “madam” firmly under her thumb.For years, domestic workers have been among the most exploited of all workers – labouring long hours for meagre pay, sometimes on the receiving end of abuse by their employers.But significant steps have been taken to improve their situation, and they are now included under the Basic Conditions of Employment and Labour Relations Acts. This means a minimum wage has been set, specific working conditions have been laid down, and other measures have been put in place to regulate a previously unregulated industry. Steps are also being taken to train domestic workers and give them formal recognition for their skills.Domestic workers are covered by the Basic Conditions of Employment and Labour Relations Acts. (Image: Solidarity Centre)To whom does the Domestic Workers Act apply?To the estimated 1 million workers in the country who work as domestics, gardeners, childminders (including drivers of children) and those who look after the sick, aged or disabled in private homes. The legislation also covers domestic workers who work as independent contractors.What is the Act all about?In a special sectoral determination, the Basic Conditions of Employment Act sets out minimum wages for domestics and specifies working conditions such as hours of work, overtime pay, salary increases, deductions, annual and sick leave.This legislation also lists the urban areas (classified as A Areas) where one minimum wage applies. A second minimum wage applies to domestic workers in non-urban areas (B Areas).The Department of Labour has an online section focusing on domestic workers where one can find additional information on the act, conditions of employment, contracts, unemployment insurance and others.What is the minimum wage?Domestic workers working in designated urban areas for more than 27 hours per week should receive R 2 422,54 a month, at an hourly rate of R 12,42. While those working in designated non-urban areas should receive R 2 205,17 per month, or an hourly rate not below R 11,31.Domestic workers working in designated urban areas for 27 hours or less per week should receive R1 237.60 a month at an hourly rate of R10.48, while those in designated non-urban areas should receive R1 056.35 a month, at R9.03 per hour.The minimum wages given are applicable from 1 December 2016 till 30 November 2017.How many hours a day can a domestic worker be expected to be on duty?According to the legislation, domestics should work no more than 45 hours a week, and should not work more than nine hours a day if they work a five-day week, or more than eight hours a day if they work for more than five days a week.Domestics should work no more than 15 hours a week overtime or more than 12 hours on any one day. Overtime is at one-and-a-half times the normal wage (or the employee may agree to receive paid time off). They should also receive double pay on Sundays or public holidays.Domestics should work no more than 15 hours a week overtime or more than 12 hours on any one day. (Image: Elin)What about accommodation?Employers whose domestics live on the property may deduct 10% of their salary for accommodation, providing the accommodation complies with the minimum standards laid down in the legislation.What happens when things go wrong?An employer wishing to dismiss a worker must give a weeks notice if the domestic has been employed for six weeks or less, and four weeks’ notice if he or she has worked for more than six months.Domestics are also entitled to severance pay of one week for each year of service, as well as four months’ unpaid maternity leave.The services of an employee may not be terminated unless a valid and fair reason exists and fair procedure is followed. This is outlined in the Labour Relations Act (Code of Good Practice, in Schedule 8).Are domestic workers entitled to UIF?If your domestic works for you for more than 24 hours a month, they must be registered with the Unemployment Insurance Fund.It is the employer’s responsibility to register their domestic worker with the UIF, and to ensure payment is made. Monthly contributions are 2% of the worker’s wage (split evenly between the employer and the employee).Employers are advised to sign an employment contract with their domestic worker and are obliged to issue a regular pay slip.Sample contracts are available off the Department of Labour’s website at www.labour.gov.za.Visit the Department of Labour’s uFiling site at www.ufiling.co.zaIs there a union for domestic workers?Yes, there is – the South African Domestic Service and Allied Workers Union, which has around 25 000 members.Watch an interview with Sadsawu’s Esther Stevens by the International Trade Union ConfederationWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more



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What Does the Term ‘Resilience’ Really Mean?

first_imgThis post originally appeared at Ensia. The term “resilience” is everywhere. And everywhere, it seems, it means something a little different. Resilience has been used to describe people and systems that bounce back from negative experiences and disturbances. It has also been used to refer to systems that survive being jostled around — whether or not they go back to where they were before, or to any stable state, for that matter.RELATED ARTICLESResilience as a Driver of ChangeResilience: Designing Homes for More Intense StormsRebuilding America and the ‘New Normal’ of ResilienceGreen Building Priority #9 – Create Resilient HousesMaking the Case for Resilient Design While some have argued that resilience is an empty concept, the widespread use of the idea of resilience across disciplines, sectors, and professions suggests it is a necessary concept. Resilience is related to change. And given the rapid change happening in the environment, technology and society, such extensive use of the term reflects this need. It does, however, lead to some questions. Where did the idea of resilience come from, and how has it developed? More importantly, how can the concept be used in ways that help us navigate a rapidly changing planet? Roots of resilience According to Ann Masten, a professor at the University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development, the idea of resilience “emerged in ecology and psychology, or the social sciences, around the same time [the 1970s] and completely independently.” The common thread, Masten says, is that it involves interactions within and among complex systems. Masten is a leading scholar of resilience in child development. In her book Ordinary Magic: Resilience in Development, she defines resilience as “[t]he capacity of a dynamic system to adapt successfully to disturbances that threaten system function, viability, or future development of the system.” This definition assumes that resilience is desirable. However, that is not the case in all uses of the idea. In ecology, the idea of resilience emerged in the 1970s from the work of ecologist C.S. (Buzz) Holling, now an emeritus professor at the University of Florida. In a seminal paper, Holling described resilience as “a measure of the persistence of systems and their ability to absorb change and disturbance and still maintain the same relationships between populations or state variables.” Lance Gunderson, a professor of environmental science at Emory University and one of Holling’s collaborators, says Holling was trying to understand how ecosystems could “flip” between different states. For example, a lake can have clear water and, given certain environmental inputs like additional nutrients, the lake can rapidly flip into a cloudy water state. According to Gunderson, Holling used the word resilience to describe what it was about ecosystems that enabled them to fluctuate widely within a state while also avoiding moving into a different state that is also resilient. Importantly, different states can be resilient, but not desirable, like a cloudy lake. Persistent poverty is an example of a social state that is both resilient and undesirable. Two key ideas Resilience thinking has further developed in recent decades in the study of systems in which humans and nature are strongly connected (or social-ecological systems). Lisen Schultz, acting deputy science director at the Stockholm Resilience Center at Stockholm University, describes resilience as “a capacity to persist, adapt or transform in the face of change in a way that maintains the basic identity of a system.” In the case of social-ecological resilience, she says, “we are interested in really enabling long-term human survival and well-being as part of the biosphere. … So, it’s quite closely linked to sustainability.” Two key ideas come out of this definition of resilience. First, resilience in human and natural systems is often associated with sustainability in the face of constant change. Second, resilience involves two kinds of response to that change. The first, adaptation, supports the resilience of a system by helping it stay in essentially the same state. However, if this state becomes untenable, the system can undergo transformational change, moving to a different stable state. So resilience is not always a matter of “bouncing back”; sometimes it involves “bouncing forward” to a new state. Transformational change helps explain why it is important to think about scale in resilience. “We often say resilience at one scale might require transformation at other scales,” Shultz says. “So, it could be that a farm needs to transform in order to maintain the resilience of the landscape. Or the landscape needs to transform in order to maintain the resilience of a nation.” Another example would be efforts to transition the world’s energy systems away fossil fuels with the aim to transform the global energy system to maintain the planet’s ability to adapt to climate change. What’s common among these three meanings of resilience — rooted in psychology, ecology, and the study of social-ecological systems — is the focus on change in complex systems, the interactions among different scales and resilience as a way to describe how a system handles change. The definitions differ in the what kind of system is being described as resilient and whether to define resilience as a desirable thing. Tip of the iceberg While this discussion highlights some of the important threads of thinking about resilience, it’s only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the diffusion of the idea. A recent paper by social scientist Susanne Moser and others that used a meta-analysis of review papers to derive seven major themes around the concept reported that a Google search of the word “resilience” yielded 67 million hits. A narrower search of only scholarly literature from 1973 (when Holling published his seminal article on resilience in ecological systems) to 2017 produced nearly 100,000 results. With all this thinking, writing, and work on resilience, what may really be needed is a better understanding of how the concept is being used to build a better world. As Moser and coauthors noted, “many practitioners urgently search for concrete guidance on how to build resilience.” Resilience in practice In recent years, many people engaged in designing, building, and stewarding the human, built, and natural environment have attempted to build resilience as a way to help people thrive in the face of environmental change. Examples include “climate resilience,” which focuses on adapting and thriving in the face of a climate change, and “community resilience,” which has roots in disaster preparedness and emergency response. “Urban resilience” is another major area of practical work around the world. In 2013, the Rockefeller Foundation launched an initiative called 100 Resilient Cities (100RC). 100RC has advanced the development of urban resilience by providing support to hire a new kind of city staff person, a chief resilience office (CRO), who leads development and implementation of a city resilience strategy. 100RC defines urban resilience as “the capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, businesses, and systems within a city to survive, adapt, and grow no matter what kinds of chronic stresses and acute shocks they experience.” This definition of urban resilience expands the meaning of resilience by recognizing that the challenges people have to deal with don’t just come in short-term events such as a hurricane. They can also be slow-moving, as in the case of persistent inequity that frays the social fabric and leaves individuals and whole communities vulnerable. Currently more than 50 cities around the world in the 100RC network have developed resilience strategies, and social issues have emerged as important. “It is fascinating how [equality] is emerging more and more strongly as an outcome that resilience should achieve at a city scale,” says Braulio Eduardo Morera, director of strategy delivery at 100RC, which is scheduled to sunset later this year. The importance of social factors, in particular social cohesion, for resilience has also emerged as important in the work of architect Doug Pierce. Pierce has helped develop RELi, a rating system and set of standards for building resilience from building to community scales. “Even if you have a building, neighborhood, or infrastructure that can weather some kind of extreme event, if you don’t have cohesiveness within the population that is part of that, it’s hard for them to respond to the event while it’s happening,” Pierce says. “And they can’t rebuild afterward if they are not cohesive.” A path forward As practitioners work on building resilience, efforts to ground the concept in specific places and systems is helping contribute to the development of a shared understanding of resilience that enables positive action. “People respond really well to highly tangible little case studies,” Pierce says. Masten, for her part, says that discussing specific scenarios helped an interdisciplinary group of scholars she was part of develop a shared understanding of the concept. And, with respect to city resilience strategies, Morera describes “clarity about shocks and stresses” as an essential part of building urban resilience effectively. More generally, social scientists recommend asking clarifying questions that ground resilience in specific systems and relationships — questions like, “Resilience of what?” and “Resilience for whom?” For example, a city could ask which climate threats — things like more intense rainstorms or heat waves — it wants to make a priority when focusing resilience planning. Within these priorities, the city can then ask who should be a priority — and could consider groups like residents of low-income neighborhoods, members of certain cultural groups, children, or elderly people. Answering questions like these can be a challenge. But given the state of the planet, resilience will likely continue to be called upon to provide a framework for working across sectors and disciplines to grapple with all kinds of change. Reflecting on the widespread use of the concepts of resilience, Masten says, “I think it’s because we are as a planet faced with major threats that are challenging multiple systems simultaneously. And if we’re going to respond effectively, whether its climate crisis, terror attacks, pandemics, or whatever, we have to be able to integrate what we know.”   Kate Knuth previously served as chief resilience officer for the City of Minneapolis, a position funded by 100 Resilient Cities.last_img read more



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New Changes To Twitter’s Embedded Tweets

first_imgIt seems there are more changes at Twitter than to the molecules of a frozen burrito in a microwave.On the heels of last month’s API change (and scare), Twitter is tweaking content delivery.Twitter product manager Brian Ellin wrote in a blog post last week that the firm is “launching a new tool that makes it easy to embed interactive timelines of tweets on any website.”This change allows people and companies to feature interactive tweets directly on their sites. That means that third-party sites, like ESPN (which is embedding U.S. Open info), can expand tweets to display photos and media. People on the third-party sites can start a conversation, follow, reply and retweet directly from the tweet box.This expands Twitter’s ecosystem even further. Ellin’s post breaks down the myriad uses: “Whether it’s an author’s tweets alongside their blog, a hashtag about an event like #DNC2012, or a list of competitors at the U.S. Open.”Here’s a handy guide from Twitter on how to embed timelines on your site. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Tags:#twitter#web center_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit adam popesculast_img read more



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Director-general of NIFT Delhi Gauri Kumar takes up cases against copycats

first_imgNOT AMUSED: KumarCopycats and aspiring clones beware. Gauri Kumar is here. The new director-general of the prestigious National Institute of Fashion Technology (NIFT), Delhi, is not amused at fashion schools that imitate NIFT’s logo or confuse students with similar names and acronyms.Like IIFT (International Institute of Fashion Technology), NAFT (National,NOT AMUSED: KumarCopycats and aspiring clones beware. Gauri Kumar is here. The new director-general of the prestigious National Institute of Fashion Technology (NIFT), Delhi, is not amused at fashion schools that imitate NIFT’s logo or confuse students with similar names and acronyms.Like IIFT (International Institute of Fashion Technology), NAFT (National Academy of Fashion Technology) and a bunch of others that have sprung up over the years.In her first press interview after taking over as head of the country’s premier design institute, Kumar says rather purposefully: “We will initiate legal proceedings after studying each case.”Kumar has a legacy to fall back on. NIFT already has a case pending in the Delhi High Court against the National Institute of Fashion Design (NIFD) – a chain of 84 institutes all over the country with its head office in Chandigarh – for allegedly sporting a similar logo.”I don’t think people are so uneducated that they would get confused between an NIFT and an NIFD. This is not some nursery school,” retorts Vikramjit Singh Sahney, chairperson (Delhi region) for NIFD. “I think NIFT’s main worry stems from other reasons such as the fact that at a recent contest in Kolkata, I’m told an NIFD student won the first prize and only the second prize went to an NIFT student.”Over to Kumar.last_img read more



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Liberal backbencher apologizes for not including women in notable calendar

first_imgWINNIPEG — A Liberal member of Parliament is apologizing for putting out a calendar that features notable Canadians — all of whom are men.Robert-Falcon Ouellette, who represents the riding of Winnipeg Centre, recently sent a calendar by mail to his constituents that profiled 12 Canadians.The list includes former politicians, a hockey player and an Indigenous leader, and no women.The calendar was quickly condemned on social media, and Ouellette’s Facebook account responded by posting apologies dozens of times.In one online comment, Ouellette said he is sorry for the mistake and plans to issue another calendar soon featuring notable women.Ouellette was first elected in 2015 in a seat that had been a long-time NDP stronghold.“I was attempting to highlight notable people of Winnipeg. I am very sorry,” reads one post on Ouellette’s Facebook page.“I will be getting another calendar ready tomorrow,” reads another.The Canadian Presslast_img read more



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