Biomimetics Roundup

first_imgHere’s a quick rundown of news on new technologies emerging from the study of plants, animals, and cells.Toxin sponges:  PhysOrg reported on “biomimetic nanospongers” made of absorbent material wrapped in red blood cell membranes that can drift in the bloodstream as “decoys” to absorb bacterial toxins and snake venom.  Instead of poking holes in live blood cells, the toxins poke them into the sponges harmlessly, which are then eliminated by the liver.Nano-cellulose:  Promising “one of the most important potential agricultural transformations ever,” a researcher has “engineered algae” to manufacture “nano-cellulose,” a “wonder material” can become the raw material for “sustainable production of biofuels and many other products.”  While producing the nanocellulose, the algae mop carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.  See PhysOrg.Nano-fabrication:  Need to form precise shapes on graphene at billionths of a meter?  Use DNA as a template, reported PhysOrg on efforts at MIT to perfect the technology.  It might be used to fashion nano-circuits such as “electronic chips made of graphene, a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon with unique electronic properties.”From parasite to patch:  A surgical patch more effective than sutures or staples has been developed by inspiration from a parasite, reported Science Now.  “By mimicking a technique used by an intestinal parasite of fish,” namely a spiny-headed worm that embeds itself into the fish’s intestine, researchers created a “flexible patch studded with microneedles that holds skin grafts in place more strongly than surgical staples do.”  It’s 3 times stronger than surgical staples, PhysOrg said.No hit; new use for road apples:  Believe it or not, scientists have found a useful enzyme in horse feces that might help world biofuel production.  Science Daily said that a horse pile houses a fungus that can convert cellulose to sugars, promising “a potential treasure trove of enzymes for solving this problem and reducing the cost of biofuels.”  Who woulda thunk as they heard that plunk.Bat wing and a pinch of inspiration:  Inventor of a robotic bat wing said it all: “Bats are just really amazing, spectacular flyers,” Joseph Bahlman said for Live Science.  “Their wings are extremely dynamic, so much more dynamic than birds or insects. If you look at the wings of a bat, they’re just like our hands, they have all these joints that let their wings adapt into lots of different shapes, giving them a tremendous range of aerodynamic forces and maneuverabilities. They fly much better than anything we’ve engineered. I would love to figure out how that works and then duplicate it.”Where you bean, amigo:  Efforts to control pesky bedbugs have been largely unsuccessful, frustrating many a homeowner and hotel client.  Now, scientists are building synthetic traps “inspired by an age-old remedy formerly used in Bulgaria and Serbia where kidney-bean leaves were strewn on the floor next to beds to trap the bugs.”  That’s right; bean leaves successfully trap the critters, reported Nature, Live Science and the BBC News.  Tiny hairs impale the bugs’ feet, leaving them helpless to die.  The synthetic versions don’t work as well yet, but scientists have their inspiration for a pesticide-free solution.  “Plants exhibit extraordinary abilities to entrap insects,” a researcher said.  “Nature is a hard act to follow,” said another.The only mention of evolution, in the bean-leaf bedbug story, was not particularly helpful to Darwinism: “There is absolutely no evolutionary history between bean plants and bedbugs, so this entrapment effect on bedbugs specifically is purely coincidental.”These are all new biomimetics ventures, not previously reported, indicating that the field continues to grow and branch out into more and more areas.  These Darwin-free projects are bringing science back to its old design-theoretic, people-sympathetic roots.  Take Joseph Bahlman’s attitude (bat wing story) and run with it. (Visited 35 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more



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AADYA® SET OF 7 LARGE : Shopping on a budget payed off!

first_imgThese are terrific, i didn’t definitely hope them to be so good as they are truly inexpensive when compared to kinds i have purchased in boots and so forth. Im impressed and would absolutely get them yet again, they are a very good measurement, grip perfectly, awesome solid colours. Severely a great purchase, thank you.These truly are outstanding and substantially greater than i was anticipating. A few of twists and they maintain my hair, which is just long plenty of to tie back again, in area. I do not have to use just about anything else.AADYA® SET OF 7 LARGE (12cm) VELVET HAIR SCRUNCHIES ELASTIC SCRUNCHY HAIR BOBBLESBrand : Aadya10cm – 12cm in Normal Condition20cm – 22cm Full stretched LengthSet of 7 Large Soft Velvet Hair Scrunchies Bobbles Elastic Hair BandsRED, BLACK, GREEN, MARRON, PINK, SKY BLUE AND PURPLE For More Colour Please Visit My ShopGreat high quality and fit properly in your hair. These beautiful selection of coloured scrunchies are a need to have for every single lady. Great excellent and suit nicely in your hair. Bright and vibrant colors at a extremely very affordable cost. Easy and good for all situations.Purchasing on a spending plan payed off. Im not sure what the other reviewers have been speaking about as these scrunchies are the fantastic measurement for thick hair and the selection of colors are fantastic. For so low-priced i was so amazed.Large velvet hair scrunchies. Very good good quality scrunchies & the colours are wonderful as well. I have medium thick hair & can wrap the scrunchies round my ponytail either 2 or three periods devoid of a challenge. All in all, a excellent get & i would obtain from them once again :).AADYA® SET OF 7 LARGE (12cm) VELVET HAIR SCRUNCHIES ELASTIC SCRUNCHY HAIR BOBBLES : Lovely colours of scrunchies and a great bargain too. Very nice colours; arrived quickly; packaged nicely in a waterproof envelope for protection. Bought these for my sister who loves these as she has medium to thick hair and they hold her hair up nicely. Great bargain as there are 7 of them in different colours. The velvet feel is nice too. If you like scrunchies then these are for you. And is not going to snag your hair either. . I have just despatched for 5 far more packets.By the way, in their cellophane, they appear like contemporary art, maybe kandinsky but i’m not positive which, in any case it is really virtually worth framing them.I have worn them for managing (always a excellent take a look at for thick. I found these experienced some unfavorable reaction, but mine arrived as explained and they do the job. I have worn them for jogging (generally a superior test for thick, sweaty hair) and they saved my hair in place and i was not concerned about my ponytail starting to be eliminate or owning fly away strands of hair or whichever. For the cash they are a deal as two of them expenditures all around a fiver in a effectively regarded chemist.My hair is extensive and pretty thick. Update: i have ordered more (as i have missing one particular or two). They are as superior now as they were being when i 1st acquired them and they clean up quite effectively.last_img read more



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Field Day with Jordan Hoewischer: Nationwide Insurance

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentHost Jordan Hoewischer sits down with Dan Durheim, associate vice president, Nationwide Sponsor Relations; Shawnda Vega, account executive, Nationwide Sponsor Relations; and Tim Hicks, business development field director for Ohio Farm Bureau, to discuss the history between Ohio Farm Bureau and Nationwide and how the two organizations remain committed to providing programs and solutions to meet members’ needs.Field Day with Jordan Hoewischer is an ongoing series of conversations with experts and leaders who are helping to shape and secure the future of Ohio’s ag industry for generations to come.Following are some highlights from this episode. Read the complete transcript.Q: So I know a lot of our members, a lot of people listening, the general public may know why Farm Bureau and Nationwide are connected so I guess whoever wants to go… Why Nationwide, why Farm Bureau, why are we here. What’s the connective point with Nationwide and Farm Bureau?Dan Durheim: Nationwide started with a loan from the Ohio Farm Bureau and one of the things that’s core, was core then and is core today is that we saw that there was a need to serve farmers…farmers really had a need to have a specific product that would take care of and was priced accordingly for the needs to protect the things that mattered most to them. Fast forward to today. Much of the same. Right? Our heritage is in the same place. What are those incredible solutions that customers, members, need and desire and that’s at the very core of who Nationwide is today and I love working for an organization that is as committed to the people as when it started right. So you think about that initial loan that meaningless little bit of $10,000 that has turned a company like Nationwide into a Fortune 100 company based upon the needs of farmers and ranchers and being relevant to what happens in those communities. And I think that’s a really neat story as to why we still have a very deep relationship.Tim Hicks: My favorite thing about the relationship that we have with Nationwide and it’s kind of been talked around a little bit today but it’s all about that relationship that we have at a lot of different levels. So you’ve got the board of directors of Nationwide they’ve got a great relationship with Ohio Farm Bureau board of directors and leadership and among the other eight sponsor states that you guys have a relationship with. Shawnda and I have a relationship. We talk regularly.The relationships between county leaders and field staff from our Farm Bureau with Nationwide agents. You’ve got all these different products and solutions and we’re working with the folks at Nationwide to make sure that they they are the best.Q. So moving forward to the future. Is there anything that jumps out is as a highlight to look forward to in 2019 or beyond; anything that jumps off the page for you?Shawnda Vega: There’s a few things in 2019 I’m particularly excited about. So I think as we talk about how we connect the organizations, one thing is we’re looking at a safety program. It’s a rollout. Kind of been Tim’s baby, some modules but then also you know getting our risk, getting our subject matter experts out to actually work with communities and deliver some content. I think that’s going to be really exciting hopefully in Q1 to Q2.Dan Durheim:  As we think about 2019 Jordan we want to continue to do better at having the right speed and ease for customers to get what they want. The thing that won’t change is our commitment to each other. Our commitment to the Farm Bureau, our commitment to being a mutual company. There’s a lot of value in the fact that our shareholders are our members right. There’s nobody out there or else directing so we can make these major investments in better technology and better ways that we serve what’s going on because it is changing. The way people drive is different. The way people take in information is different. I think members Farm Bureau members particularly expect us to know. Show up with the know. Show up with having had this deep relationship with the Farm Bureau to have the best solution for us to to choose, and we we are bullish enough to think we should have this deep seeded relationship that allows us to beat, to earn, the right to your business.     Leave a Commentlast_img read more



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Trump, Abe Signal Deal

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jerry HagstromDTN Political CorrespondentWASHINGTON, D.C. (DTN) — President Donald Trump and Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced Sunday that the two countries have reached a trade deal that will involve large Japanese purchases of U.S. corn and wheat.In a report Saturday, Nikkei, a Japanese news organization, reported that Japan had agreed to grant the United States the same level of tariffs on agricultural products that other countries have gotten through the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), from which Trump withdrew, in exchange for an exemption from Trump’s proposal to increase auto tariffs.At a joint news conference on the sidelines of the G-7 meeting in France, Trump said, “We’ve been working on a deal with Japan for a long time. It involves agricultural and it involves e-commerce and many other things. It’s a very big transaction, and we’ve agreed in principle. It’s billions and billions of dollars. Tremendous for the farmers.”“And one of the things that Prime Minister Abe has also agreed to is we have excess corn in various parts of our country, with our farmers, because China did not do what they said they were going to do,” Trump said. “And Prime Minister Abe, on behalf of Japan, they’re going to be buying all of that corn. And that’s a very big transaction. They’re going to be buying it from our farmers.”“So the deal is done in principle.”Trump and Abe both said they probably will be signing it around the United Nations General Assembly meeting in New York in September.The deal comes after a difficult month for farmers with higher tariffs promised for China and EPA granting 31 waivers to oil refiners from Renewable Fuel Standard obligations. The president has been looking for a win in agriculture.“This is a tremendous deal for the United States,” Trump said. “It’s a really, tremendous deal for our farmers and agricultural ranchers, and also involves other things, including, as I said, e-commerce.”Abe said that the two countries had “successfully reached consensus with regard to the core elements of both the agricultural and industrial products of our bilateral consultations on August the 23rd. And I certainly welcome this development.”Trump then told Abe, “Perhaps you may want to discuss the additional purchase of all of that corn, because we have a tremendous amount right now. And we’ve been working with the farmers and making very, very large payments for the unfair way they were treated by China.”“And the farmers are very happy,” Trump said. “They like — they like their president. They’re very happy. But I think it’s even better, and I think they’re even happier, when they hear you’re actually buying their products.“So perhaps you could say a couple of words just about the hundreds of millions of dollars of corn – existing corn – that’s there, that you’ll be buying.”While Trump’s remarks made the decision to buy U.S. corn sound almost like a favor, Abe indicated that Japan needs the corn.“So with regard to the potential purchase of American corn, in Japan we are now experiencing insect pest on some of the agricultural products,” Abe said.“And there is a need for us to buy a certain amount of agricultural products. And this will be done by the Japanese private sector. That means that Japanese corporations will need to buy additional agricultural products.“And we believe that there is a need for us to implement emergency support measures for the Japanese private sector to have the early purchase of the American corn.”Trump responded, “And the Japanese private sector listens to the Japanese public sector very strongly. I’m not sure. It’s a little different than it is in our country perhaps. But they are – they have great respect for the public sector. So when I hear the private sector has agreed to this, we’re very happy about that.”Trump later tweeted, “Big Trade Deal just agreed to with Prime Minister Abe of Japan. Will be great for our Farmers, Ranchers and more. Really big Corn purchase!”Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue pointed out, “Japan is a significant market for United States agriculture exports, making today a good day for American agriculture. By removing existing barriers for our products, we will be able to sell more to the Japanese markets. At the same time we will able to close gaps to better allow us to compete on a level playing field with our competitors. I thank President Trump and Ambassador Lighthizer for their constant support of America’s farmers and ranchers and their hard work negotiating better trade deals around the globe.”At Trump’s urging, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said, “Well, first of all, what we have is an agreement on core principles.”“It has three parts: agriculture, industrial tariffs, and digital trade. And from our point of view, it is extremely important to our farmers and ranchers and those people who work in the digital space.“We’ll get into the details at another time, but generally, Japanese is our third-largest agricultural market. They import about $14 billion worth of U.S. agricultural products. And this will open up markets to over $7 billion of those products.“In the agriculture area, it will be a major benefit for beef, pork, wheat, dairy products, wine, ethanol, and a variety of other products.“It will lead to substantial reductions in tariffs and non-tariff barriers across the board. And I’ll just give you one example: Japan is, by far, our biggest beef market. We sell over $2 billion worth of beef to Japan. And this allows us to do with lower tariffs and to compete more effectively with people across the board, particularly the TPP countries and Europe.“So it’s very good news for our farmers and ranchers, but it’s also good news for those who work in the digital e-commerce space where it is the gold standard of an international agreement. This is an area that not only has been important to the President but been of particular importance to the prime minister.”Trump added, “This is a massive purchase of wheat also, in addition to everything else. This is a very large purchase of wheat, and the very, very large order of corn will go quickly. But importantly, it’s something that wasn’t in the agreement that we may not even — we may do that as a supplementary agreement. But we appreciate that very much. We just agreed to that on the other idea of the door.”“So I just appreciate that very much. And we’ll do a great job. And the farmers are very thankful. Thank you very much.”American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall said, “America’s farmers and ranchers are pleased to hear that the U.S. and Japan may be close to a trade deal that includes agriculture.”“This is much-needed good news on the agricultural trade front,” Duvall said.National Pork Producers Council President David Herring, a pork producer from Lillington, N.C., said, “We thank the Trump administration for negotiating a trade agreement with Japan, a market that represented 25 percent of total U.S. pork exports last year. We look forward to rapid implementation of the agreement as international competitors are currently taking U.S. pork market share through more favorable access. he said.“The United States produces the safest, highest-quality and most affordable pork in the world. It is the preference of many Japanese customers and we look forward to competing on a level playing field again.”An executive vice president for the U.S Chamber of Commerce called the announcement “a welcome step in the right direction,” but called for a comprehensive trade deal between the two countries. “American companies and agriculture exporters are at a clear disadvantage to their Asia-Pacific and European counterparts in the absence of a comprehensive trade deal with Japan,” said Myron Brilliant, executive vice president and head of international affairs for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Brilliant added, “Given the existing volatility and uncertainty in global markets, today’s news that the administration is making progress in talks with Japan, one of our most important trading partners, is a welcome step in the right direction. However, the U.S. Chamber strongly urges the Trump Administration to continue its efforts to reach a comprehensive, high-standard agreement that addresses the full range of U.S. trade priorities from services and intellectual property protection to regulatory barriers. By securing that broader agreement, the administration will spur significant economic growth, create U.S. jobs, and open up other avenues for expanding our market access and commercial ties to the vital Asia-Pacific region.”DTN Ag Policy Editor Chris Clayton contributed to this report.Jerry Hagstrom can be reached at jhagstrom@njdc.comFollow him on Twitter @hagstromreport(SK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more



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