Corning High football team falls 33-23 to Anderson

first_imgCorning >> Less than two minutes into homecoming and the Corning High football team led Anderson 9-0 courtesy of a safety and ensuing kick return for a touchdown Friday night at Cardinal Stadium. But Anderson would eventually establish its advantage on both sides of the trenches, and as a result slowly grab hold of the momentum en route to a 33-23 win over the Cardinals on their homecoming night. “We knew they would be really good up front and were going to be really physical,” Corning coach …last_img



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Junior Boks romp into World Champs semis

first_img10 June 2014 After an impressive victory over New Zealand, the Junior Springboks were expected to dominate Samoa at the ECO Light Stadium in Pukekohe on Tuesday in a Pool C clash at the IRB Junior World Championships. It turned out to be a tough encounter. In the end, South Africa claimed a very difficult 21-8 victory, but it was a below standard showing from Handre Pollard and company.‘It wasn’t a clinical performance’ “It wasn’t a clinical performance from us, there were a lot of errors,” Pollard said in a post-match interview. “ “We have to rectify that in the semi-finals, but we got the win. That’s all we wanted, to get the two points to go to the semi-finals.”‘They had great commitment’ The South African captain also praised Samoa for their performance, saying: “They had great commitment all the way through [the game]. Our guys were a bit flat, but we came out better in the second half and got the win.” Looking ahead to the semi-finals, with South Africa’s opponents not yet determined, Pollard concluded: “We don’t care who we play in the semi-finals. We just want to get there because once you are there anything can happen.”‘Our boys did their best’ Samoan captain Henry Stowers lauded the effort put in by his team: “Our boys did their best and that’s all I could ask for. I’m just proud of them. We took it to South Africa and we will bounce back from this,” he said. Beaten 48-12 by New Zealand, the Samoans, surprisingly, took an 8-7 lead into halftime as a below-standard South African first half and wet conditions aided the islanders. The first 40 minutes were an arm-wrestle and it took a long time for the first points to be scored. When they were at last, they went the way of Samoa in the 32nd minute when Nathaniel Apa dotted down from a charged down clearance off the boot of Jesse Kriel. Junior Springbok try Three minutes from the break, Aidon Davis crashed over the tryline for the Junior Boks from a five-metre scrum, with Handre Pollard adding the conversion to give South Africa the lead. It didn’t last long as William Talaitane Mu knocked over a penalty on the stroke of halftime to edge Samoa in front. Early in the second half, South Africa butchered a gilt-edged try-scoring opportunity after a lovely break by Pollard. He was caught just short of the tryline, but the passing by the backs, once the ball was freed up and moved right, was poor and the opportunity to take the lead was missed.Yellow cards Samoa’s propensity for pushing the limits and for dangerous tackling came back to hurt them, however, as they were forced into playing mostly in their half. They had lost eighthman Richard Mariota to a yellow card for repeated infringements in the loose late in the first half, during which Davis scored for the Junior Springboks. Early in the second half, they lost Apa to another yellow card for a high, swinging arm tackle on Sergeal Petersen. With Apa watching from the sidelines, South Africa messed up another try-scoring chance when they forced the Samoans back onto their tryline from a set scrum, but Davis knocked on in the act of dotting down. Samoa celebrated a small victory, but it didn’t come from their brilliance, rather from another Junior Springboks’ error, and the pressure was mounting on them. Against New Zealand, South Africa had chosen to kick for the corner from penalties on a number of occasions, rather than kick at goal, but when the Samoans gave another one away, Pollard opted for a go at goal. His miss meant the men in green and gold still trailed.South Africa in the lead In the 63rd minute, Dawie Theron’s charges at last regained the lead they had held so briefly late in the first half when centre Andre Esterhuizen broke through two tackles after the Junior Boks had fed a lineout inside the islanders’ 22. He crashed over next to the uprights to make it 12-8 to South Africa. Pollard’s successful conversion attempt extended the advantage to 14-8. Samoa managed to put the Junior Springboks under some pressure in the game’s last five minutes, but the South Africans stood up to the challenge. Then, with time almost up, the Samoans were made to pay for a loose pass as Petersen rushed up onto the ball, kicked it ahead and fell on it over the tryline. Pollard added the conversion to make the final score South Africa 21, Samoa 8. It had been a tough contest, during which the Baby Boks were asked many questions. In the end they won to top their pool and secure a place in the semi- finals, but they will know that more work needs to be done before their next match, with a place in the final on the line.last_img read more



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Yetter compact residue managers incorporate new, convenient features

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Yetter Manufacturing is releasing new product features for the Short Titan series. The product models with the new features include the 2967-029A/2967-097A Short Titan™ with operating widths of 22–40ʺ and the 2967-013A / 2967-014A Short Narrow Titan with operating widths of 15ʺ–22ʺ.The Short Titan series’ new design has features that allow for more convenient and faster installation of the Precision Planting CleanSweep. The 2967-029A / 2967-013A now have welded ear tabs on the faceplate, whereas the previous model required the pivot tab for the cylinder to be bolted on. The redesigned handle also provides a contact point when the residue managers reach maximum travel and a mounting point for the cylinder.The 2967-097A/2967-014A include these improved features as well, but they have also been designed to become more universal by utilizing the 2966-097 mounting kit. The 2967-097A / 2967-014A are the combination of the 2967-029A /2967-013A with the 2966-097 kit, which is the mounting plate with hardware. As a result, should a grower choose to switch planters (for example, John Deere, Kinze, CNH, or AGCO), instead of purchasing new residue managers, they now can transfer their existing models to the new planter. The 2966-097 also allows for faceplate-mounted attachments to be mounted on CNH planters by only purchasing the mounting kit.With the new design our customers will spend less time installing the CleanSweep cylinder to their residue managers or changing brands of planters by making the residue managers more universal with the faceplate mounting kit.last_img read more



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What Does the Term ‘Resilience’ Really Mean?

first_imgThis post originally appeared at Ensia. The term “resilience” is everywhere. And everywhere, it seems, it means something a little different. Resilience has been used to describe people and systems that bounce back from negative experiences and disturbances. It has also been used to refer to systems that survive being jostled around — whether or not they go back to where they were before, or to any stable state, for that matter.RELATED ARTICLESResilience as a Driver of ChangeResilience: Designing Homes for More Intense StormsRebuilding America and the ‘New Normal’ of ResilienceGreen Building Priority #9 – Create Resilient HousesMaking the Case for Resilient Design While some have argued that resilience is an empty concept, the widespread use of the idea of resilience across disciplines, sectors, and professions suggests it is a necessary concept. Resilience is related to change. And given the rapid change happening in the environment, technology and society, such extensive use of the term reflects this need. It does, however, lead to some questions. Where did the idea of resilience come from, and how has it developed? More importantly, how can the concept be used in ways that help us navigate a rapidly changing planet? Roots of resilience According to Ann Masten, a professor at the University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development, the idea of resilience “emerged in ecology and psychology, or the social sciences, around the same time [the 1970s] and completely independently.” The common thread, Masten says, is that it involves interactions within and among complex systems. Masten is a leading scholar of resilience in child development. In her book Ordinary Magic: Resilience in Development, she defines resilience as “[t]he capacity of a dynamic system to adapt successfully to disturbances that threaten system function, viability, or future development of the system.” This definition assumes that resilience is desirable. However, that is not the case in all uses of the idea. In ecology, the idea of resilience emerged in the 1970s from the work of ecologist C.S. (Buzz) Holling, now an emeritus professor at the University of Florida. In a seminal paper, Holling described resilience as “a measure of the persistence of systems and their ability to absorb change and disturbance and still maintain the same relationships between populations or state variables.” Lance Gunderson, a professor of environmental science at Emory University and one of Holling’s collaborators, says Holling was trying to understand how ecosystems could “flip” between different states. For example, a lake can have clear water and, given certain environmental inputs like additional nutrients, the lake can rapidly flip into a cloudy water state. According to Gunderson, Holling used the word resilience to describe what it was about ecosystems that enabled them to fluctuate widely within a state while also avoiding moving into a different state that is also resilient. Importantly, different states can be resilient, but not desirable, like a cloudy lake. Persistent poverty is an example of a social state that is both resilient and undesirable. Two key ideas Resilience thinking has further developed in recent decades in the study of systems in which humans and nature are strongly connected (or social-ecological systems). Lisen Schultz, acting deputy science director at the Stockholm Resilience Center at Stockholm University, describes resilience as “a capacity to persist, adapt or transform in the face of change in a way that maintains the basic identity of a system.” In the case of social-ecological resilience, she says, “we are interested in really enabling long-term human survival and well-being as part of the biosphere. … So, it’s quite closely linked to sustainability.” Two key ideas come out of this definition of resilience. First, resilience in human and natural systems is often associated with sustainability in the face of constant change. Second, resilience involves two kinds of response to that change. The first, adaptation, supports the resilience of a system by helping it stay in essentially the same state. However, if this state becomes untenable, the system can undergo transformational change, moving to a different stable state. So resilience is not always a matter of “bouncing back”; sometimes it involves “bouncing forward” to a new state. Transformational change helps explain why it is important to think about scale in resilience. “We often say resilience at one scale might require transformation at other scales,” Shultz says. “So, it could be that a farm needs to transform in order to maintain the resilience of the landscape. Or the landscape needs to transform in order to maintain the resilience of a nation.” Another example would be efforts to transition the world’s energy systems away fossil fuels with the aim to transform the global energy system to maintain the planet’s ability to adapt to climate change. What’s common among these three meanings of resilience — rooted in psychology, ecology, and the study of social-ecological systems — is the focus on change in complex systems, the interactions among different scales and resilience as a way to describe how a system handles change. The definitions differ in the what kind of system is being described as resilient and whether to define resilience as a desirable thing. Tip of the iceberg While this discussion highlights some of the important threads of thinking about resilience, it’s only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the diffusion of the idea. A recent paper by social scientist Susanne Moser and others that used a meta-analysis of review papers to derive seven major themes around the concept reported that a Google search of the word “resilience” yielded 67 million hits. A narrower search of only scholarly literature from 1973 (when Holling published his seminal article on resilience in ecological systems) to 2017 produced nearly 100,000 results. With all this thinking, writing, and work on resilience, what may really be needed is a better understanding of how the concept is being used to build a better world. As Moser and coauthors noted, “many practitioners urgently search for concrete guidance on how to build resilience.” Resilience in practice In recent years, many people engaged in designing, building, and stewarding the human, built, and natural environment have attempted to build resilience as a way to help people thrive in the face of environmental change. Examples include “climate resilience,” which focuses on adapting and thriving in the face of a climate change, and “community resilience,” which has roots in disaster preparedness and emergency response. “Urban resilience” is another major area of practical work around the world. In 2013, the Rockefeller Foundation launched an initiative called 100 Resilient Cities (100RC). 100RC has advanced the development of urban resilience by providing support to hire a new kind of city staff person, a chief resilience office (CRO), who leads development and implementation of a city resilience strategy. 100RC defines urban resilience as “the capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, businesses, and systems within a city to survive, adapt, and grow no matter what kinds of chronic stresses and acute shocks they experience.” This definition of urban resilience expands the meaning of resilience by recognizing that the challenges people have to deal with don’t just come in short-term events such as a hurricane. They can also be slow-moving, as in the case of persistent inequity that frays the social fabric and leaves individuals and whole communities vulnerable. Currently more than 50 cities around the world in the 100RC network have developed resilience strategies, and social issues have emerged as important. “It is fascinating how [equality] is emerging more and more strongly as an outcome that resilience should achieve at a city scale,” says Braulio Eduardo Morera, director of strategy delivery at 100RC, which is scheduled to sunset later this year. The importance of social factors, in particular social cohesion, for resilience has also emerged as important in the work of architect Doug Pierce. Pierce has helped develop RELi, a rating system and set of standards for building resilience from building to community scales. “Even if you have a building, neighborhood, or infrastructure that can weather some kind of extreme event, if you don’t have cohesiveness within the population that is part of that, it’s hard for them to respond to the event while it’s happening,” Pierce says. “And they can’t rebuild afterward if they are not cohesive.” A path forward As practitioners work on building resilience, efforts to ground the concept in specific places and systems is helping contribute to the development of a shared understanding of resilience that enables positive action. “People respond really well to highly tangible little case studies,” Pierce says. Masten, for her part, says that discussing specific scenarios helped an interdisciplinary group of scholars she was part of develop a shared understanding of the concept. And, with respect to city resilience strategies, Morera describes “clarity about shocks and stresses” as an essential part of building urban resilience effectively. More generally, social scientists recommend asking clarifying questions that ground resilience in specific systems and relationships — questions like, “Resilience of what?” and “Resilience for whom?” For example, a city could ask which climate threats — things like more intense rainstorms or heat waves — it wants to make a priority when focusing resilience planning. Within these priorities, the city can then ask who should be a priority — and could consider groups like residents of low-income neighborhoods, members of certain cultural groups, children, or elderly people. Answering questions like these can be a challenge. But given the state of the planet, resilience will likely continue to be called upon to provide a framework for working across sectors and disciplines to grapple with all kinds of change. Reflecting on the widespread use of the concepts of resilience, Masten says, “I think it’s because we are as a planet faced with major threats that are challenging multiple systems simultaneously. And if we’re going to respond effectively, whether its climate crisis, terror attacks, pandemics, or whatever, we have to be able to integrate what we know.”   Kate Knuth previously served as chief resilience officer for the City of Minneapolis, a position funded by 100 Resilient Cities.last_img read more



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New Changes To Twitter’s Embedded Tweets

first_imgIt seems there are more changes at Twitter than to the molecules of a frozen burrito in a microwave.On the heels of last month’s API change (and scare), Twitter is tweaking content delivery.Twitter product manager Brian Ellin wrote in a blog post last week that the firm is “launching a new tool that makes it easy to embed interactive timelines of tweets on any website.”This change allows people and companies to feature interactive tweets directly on their sites. That means that third-party sites, like ESPN (which is embedding U.S. Open info), can expand tweets to display photos and media. People on the third-party sites can start a conversation, follow, reply and retweet directly from the tweet box.This expands Twitter’s ecosystem even further. Ellin’s post breaks down the myriad uses: “Whether it’s an author’s tweets alongside their blog, a hashtag about an event like #DNC2012, or a list of competitors at the U.S. Open.”Here’s a handy guide from Twitter on how to embed timelines on your site. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Tags:#twitter#web center_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit adam popesculast_img read more



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Windows Phone, Still An Underdog, Comes Out Swinging In A New Ad

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology brian s hall Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts Windows Phone got some good news and some bad news today from the consumer research firm Kantar. The bad: Microsoft’s smartphone OS accounted for a meager 5.6% of all U.S. smartphone sales in the first quarter. The comparable number for Android was 49%; for iOS, 44%.The good: Windows Phone’s showing was a significant improvement, up a full 1.9 percentage points over a year earlier. By contrast, Blackberry — which is rolling out its new operating system, BlackBerry 10 — saw its U.S. share crater in the quarter to less than 1% from 3.7% a year ago. In a statement, Kantar analyst Mary-Ann Paralto noted that Windows Phone is “now at its highest sales share figure” ever in the U.S. Possibly in anticipation of the good news, Microsoft has just released a new Windows Phone commercial. It doesn’t show off the platform nor offer any reason why Windows Phone is a better choice than its rivals. Rather, it takes a page from Samsung and mocks both iPhone and Android users. Tags:#Android#iPhone#Microsoft#Windows Phone When you’re far behind in the market, casting yourself as a viable alternative to the market leaders — while simultaneously mocking said leaders — can be a winning strategy. Or, you know, it can smack of desperation.In this case, however, the ad is so over-the-top, and Microsoft appears to be having so much fun making fun of iPhone and Android users, that it works. Android users are silly hipsters. iPhone users are old. Siri doesn’t work. Samsung devices are ridiculously large.Will the ad help Microsoft sell more Windows Phone phones? Doubtful.The problem is that the ad is focused on the wrong audience: current iPhone and Android users. Even at the end, Microsoft says, “don’t fight, switch.” Only, those existing users aren’t Microsoft’s logical target. Microsoft needs to target folks who haven’t yet chosen a side — that is, owners of non-smartphones (what the industry, for its own unfathomable reasons, calls “feature phones”). The Kantar survey noted as much (emphasis added): Windows strength appears to be the ability to attract first time smartphone buyers, upgrading from a featurephone. Of those who changed their phone over the last year to a Windows smartphone, 52% had previously owned a featurephone.  Building market share based on getting iPhone and Android users to switch is likely not a winning strategy, at least not yet. An analysis of U.S. smartphone owners, for example, found that 91% of current iPhone owners planned to stay with the platform — and the majority of those who were likely to switch planned to switch to Android. A smaller, though still sizable 76% of Android users planned to stay with the platform. Most of those likely to switch intend to get an iPhone, not Windows Phone.But there’s no reason to expect the rational from Microsoft — not when it’s so far behind. With the new mocking ad, and the large gap between Windows Phone and leaders iPhone and Android, expect Microsoft’s marketing to become even more aggressive and in-your-face.Earlier this year, founder Bill Gates publicly stated he was not pleased with Microsoft’s mobile device sales and he characterized the company’s smartphone strategy as a “mistake.” That no doubt lit a fire under Steve Ballmer and company. Who knows, maybe the scenes inside Microsoft’s Redmond headquarters are as acrimonious as those in its newest commercial. Along with the U.S., Kantar tracks smartphone sales data in 9 countries, including China, Australia, Japan, France and Great Britain. Now that Symbian has been effectively deprecated, Windows Phone appears set to take third place — a very distant third place — in all of them, with the possible exception of Japan.  Lead image from Windows Phone video Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementlast_img read more



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How Android 4.3 Jelly Bean Points Towards A Future Of Google Wearable Devices

first_imgdan rowinski Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Sometimes the roadmap for the future is directly present in the technology of today. In the case of Google, its latest update to Android could portend a future where your smartphone or tablet becomes the centerpiece in a whole ecosystem of gadgets. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Look at the specifics of Android 4.3 Jelly Bean. Google’s latest version of its popular operating system has some nominal features for publishers and users like the new Digital Rights Management functions and restricted profiles for multiple users. But the real signs show that Android could become the hub of a whole world of devices, from wearables like smartwatches to Google Glass to smart homes and television sets.Google has done this before with Android, seeding features that show the promise of things to come. With Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, Google made it easier for developers to develop towards a wide array of screen sizes from smartphones to tablets to big-screen TVs. Jelly Bean 4.3 will take that a step further.What is Bluetooth Smart?One of the most overlooked trends in technology this year is the adoption of Bluetooth Smart (also known as BLE—Bluetooth Low Energy) by major technology platforms. Apple (from the iPhone 4S and on), Microsoft and BlackBerry already has integrated BLE in their mobile operating system updates and now Google has followed with Android 4.3.Bluetooth Low Energy is a part of the Bluetooth 4.0 standard introduced into the Bluetooth Core Specification 4.0 in 2010. The capability was actually created by Nokia in 2006 before being rolled into the official Bluetooth standard. It is not backwards-compatible with older versions of Bluetooth (called “Classic”) but many of today’s newer smartphones are designated as Bluetooth Smart Ready, meaning that they can be used in dual-mode between the older and newer standards.Bluetooth Low Energy allows for similar wireless connection capability and range (about 160 feet) as Classic Bluetooth but operates at significantly improved efficiency. It not only allows for a data connection between devices but also the ability to send rich data between devices. This is where it gets interesting for the future of wearable devices.What’s New In Android 4.3?Google’s newest version of Android supports Bluetooth Smart Ready hardware as well as a standard called Bluetooth AVRCP 1.3 that supports “richer interactions with remote streaming media devices,” according to the Android developer site. For app developers, these capabilities will only be available in Android API Level 18, which represents 4.3 Jelly Bean. The AVRCP 1.3 standard is what many automobiles use these days to connect smartphones to in-car media systems and allow them to display metadata like song and artist names for audio streaming applications.Google smartwatch patentThe connection between an Android device and a Bluetooth Low Energy device is defined as central and peripheral. The central device is the smartphone or tablet while the accessory (like a smartwatch, fitness tracker or Google Glass) is defined as the peripheral. This relationship is governed by the Generic Attribute Profile (GATT) that is standard in the BLE specification.The BLE institution in Android 4.3 is fairly generic as it relates to how other platforms use the standard. What Google did with Android 4.3 was also add a new “Notification Access” feature into the operating system that will allow for new interactions for users in the status bar. For instance, a message that goes to the Android status bar can automatically be pushed to a peripheral device through BLE and include multimedia data. The Smartphone As Hub DeviceWhy is important? Well, BLE allows for the transfer of metadata and read/write functions between devices while using a fraction of the power. That means that users will be able to connect a smartwatch or another peripheral and play music, read messages or even watch videos. The tablet or smartphone is the hub with the data connection that connects it to the rest of the Internet. The central hub can then transfer data to basically any peripheral device that connects to it.It is in this way that Bluetooth Low Energy makes a true device ecosystem plausible. For devices like the forthcoming wave of smartwatches, the primary concern is battery use and power efficiency. If a smartwatch doesn’t employ its own data connection (which would be nice but not necessary), then it can last a lot longer on your wrist by flowing data through the smartphone using the efficient BLE standard. Same goes for Google Glass. Essentially, Bluetooth Smart is the key to making the wearable device industry possible. It will also be a boon to the smart home and smart car sectors. Google knows this as well as Apple, Microsoft and BlackBerry do and has built the capabilities into Android 4.3 Jelly Bean that will make it possible in the near future. Tags:#Android#Bluetooth#Google#Google Glass#smartwatch last_img read more



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Tension marks Friday prayers in Gurugram

first_imgSuhail Khan, a software engineer in Sector 39 of Gurugram, missed his regular namaz on Friday. The congregation was almost done with the prayers when the young man rushed to the open ground opposite the State Vigilance Bureau building, a few km away from his office at Unitech Cyber Park.But he was not alone. Chaos and confusion marked Friday afternoon in the Millennium City for namazis with the district administration deciding to restrict the public spaces for prayers to almost a fourth in view of opposition from right-wing organisations over the past few weeks. “I had been keeping track of it [the controversy over Namaz], but did not know about the merger of the spots. Earlier, I offered Namaz on the pavement just outside the office. It was so convenient, but it was not allowed today,” said Mr. Khan.What began as opposition to a Muslim prayer congregation at a public land in Sector 53 last month from a handful of young men from surrounding villages, soon snowballed into a full-fledged controversy. Disparate right-wing outfits in the city came together as the Sanyunkt Hindu Sangarsh Samiti and demanded a complete ban on prayers at open public spaces. Violence unleashedThe protests turned violent with the right-wing outfits disrupting the prayers at several places last Friday despite the presence of the police, saying that the congregations were “unlawful” and a “security threat”.President of the Indian Islamic Research Centre Matloob Ahmed, a DLF Phase-III resident, sees the protests as an attempt at polarisation in the run-up to the 2019 Lok Sabha elections. “With the Modi government having failed on all fronts including job creation, [curbing] black money and Swachh Bharat, the only agenda left is the Hindu-Muslim divide. How else will you explain a non-issue being made into an issue,” asked Mr. Ahmed, a former journalist.Arshan, who has been part of the delegations for talks with the administration, said the controversy over offering of namaz in the open stemmed from the fact that the few mosques around were not able to accommodate all those who wanted to offer prayers. “No one wants to offer Namaz on the roads outside in the blistering heat. But where are the mosques,” asked Arshan.There are only nine mosques in the city. “In new Gurugram, there is only one mosque and that too under litigation,” said Aslam Khan, chairman, Anjuman Jama Masjid at New Gurugram’s Sector 57. With Haryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar also saying that namaz be held inside mosques, the local administration is doing a fine balancing act. Despite the police seeking to reduce the sites for prayers this Friday at a meeting with the Muslim leaders, the civil administration deployed Duty Magistrates at all the existing 76 places on Friday to avoid the impression that they had acquiesced to the demands of the right-wing.last_img read more



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Srinagar witnesses 23 street protests within 24 hours

first_imgWhen Srinagar’s residents are not a phone call awayVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0002:0502:05  The police have recorded at least 15 late night protests and eight daytime incidents of stone pelting in the past 24 hours in Srinagar, indicating a sudden worsening of the law and order in the wake of Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan’s speech at the United Nations on Friday.Also Read  Scores of youth took to the streets in at least 15 locations across Srinagar on Friday, immediately after Mr. Khan concluded his speech. They clashed with security forces and raised slogans. The forces used tear-smoke shells to break up the protests in Batapora, Lal Bazar, Soura, Chanapora, Bagh-e-Mehtab and parts of the old city.Several youth managed to enter mosques and use its public address system to raise anti-India slogans and play religious songs, a police officer, posted in the old city, told The Hindu.Also Read  In the sudden rise, the police recorded eight incidents of stone pelting in Srinagar during the daytime on Saturday both in the old city and the uptown area. “There were nine major blockades erected by protesters,” the police officer said.When contacted, IGP S.P. Pani said he was busy and would not comment immediately.  It’s for the first time since August 20, when around 40 incidents of protests were reported, that the Valley saw a sudden spurt in street protests. The police also recorded two incidents where youth burst crackers.The Valley is in the grip of an uneasy calm since the Centre had revoked J&K’s special status. However, this month saw a significant dip in the number of incidents of stone pelting as security forces ensured no civilian casualty takes place during the clashes. Watch | When Srinagar’s residents are not a phone call awaycenter_img Explained | How Kashmir’s Special Status and Article 370 are being changed India responds to Imran Khan’s UN speech: Indian citizens do not need anyone to speak on their behalf India terms Imran Khan’s UN General Assembly address ‘hate speech’ Explained | How Kashmir’s Special Status and Article 370 are Being ChangedVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:5401:54last_img read more



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