Police seek public help finding man suspected of fatal Skyline shooting

first_img Posted: August 30, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter August 30, 2018 Police seek public help finding man suspected of fatal Skyline shooting SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Authorities asked the public Thursday for help in finding a man suspected of fatally shooting a woman this week in a Lomita-area neighborhood.Robert Haywood Reed, 38, allegedly gunned down 27-year-old Sylvianita Widman in the 100 block of South Meadowbrook Drive shortly before 5:30 p.m. Monday, according to San Diego police.Officials have not disclosed a motive for the killing. The relationship between Reed and Widman, if any, is unclear.Reed should be considered armed and dangerous, police advise.Anyone with information about the case is asked to call San Diego County Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477 or contact the agency online at sdcrimestoppers.org. Tipsters may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. KUSI Newsroom last_img read more



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Circulate San Diegos new report on aging in San Diego

first_img KUSI Newsroom, Circulate San Diego’s new report on aging in San Diego Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: May 15, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Circulate San Diego and The San Diego Foundation recently released an Age-Friendly Communities Report with La Mesa and Supporters.The report details how San Diego jurisdictions can adapt to the growing senior population by becoming Age-Friendly Communities. The report also includes research on San Diego’s senior population and best practices that San Diego cities can adopt.To read the full report click here. center_img May 15, 2019 Updated: 8:36 AM KUSI Newsroom last_img read more



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Tim BernersLee still believes the web can be fixed even today

first_imgBut he said he never anticipated how nation-states would use the web to influence elections and public discourse. After the 2016 US presidential election, he realized this was “not just about … junk out there that you should ignore, but things that people believe” that have been “manipulated by some very clever and malicious people,” he told the audience at the Post event. He said it was at that point that he and the World Wide Web Foundation, which he’d created in 2009 to promote Internet accessibility and equality, had to take “a big step back” to “reconsider the web.” How ‘pods’ can helpNow Berners-Lee says he wants to fix the problems ailing the internet, and he launched two major efforts in November to turn the web around. The first is the Contract for the Web, which he says will make the web more trustworthy and less susceptible to some of today’s problems. The other is a new platform called Solid, which gives users control over their data. The web-contract project is meant to bring together governments, tech companies and individual citizens who agree to establish common principles to govern the online world. “You can’t just outlaw fake news. It’s much more complicated,” Berners-Lee said. “The Contract for the Web is about locking in a midcourse correction, a change of momentum, back toward constructivism, back toward science, facts.” He said it’s important for as many people as possible to get involved in this effort, and he urged everyone in the audience and around the world to join the discussion. He used the issue of speech as an example. “When it comes to hate speech and free speech, we know Germany and Texas have different traditions on where to draw the line,” he said.   The Solid project, which he’s developing with researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is meant to give people more control over their personal data, which today is being bought and sold without their permission. The idea is to give people “pods” for storing data, which would let them decide where and how their information is used by apps that are separate from the data storage. That means you could control what data from your pods is accessed by services such as Amazon, Facebook and Google, he explained. “You can have a personal pod, you can have a work pod,” Berners-Lee said. It’s through these efforts that he hopes people will be able to take back control of their personal information and once again use the web for what he’d intended: sharing and collaborating for the greater good of humanity.  Tags How Chrome changed web browsers 10 years ago 4 The hyperlinks let people categorize and organize their information any way they liked, and easily share it, too. The creation of the web spawned a global technological revolution and created an entire economy that thousands of companies rely on today. Three decades after the system was proposed, half of the world’s population is now online, and there are close to 2 billion websites. But it was CERN’s decision in 1993 to keep the Hypertext Transfer Protocol, or HTTP, free and open that allowed the web to flourish. Berners-Lee described how the Gopher protocol, a competitor to HTTP, declined after the University of Minnesota announced it would charge licensing fees. “I’m still not a gazillionaire,” he said. “But that’s fine, otherwise the web wouldn’t have existed.” Trouble brewing Berners-Lee said he was always aware of the potential problems of the web. After all, he explained, there are bad people walking down the street, and those people, like millions of others, have found their way online. But he said it wasn’t until the advent of social media that these voices became amplified. Still, he said he often preached the importance of thoughtful web consumption, telling people who complained of internet trolls to not “browse the garbage websites.” You can’t just outlaw fake news. It’s much more complicated. Tim Berners-Lee 2:24 Where the web began On March 12, 1989, Berners-Lee, who was working at CERN, a physics laboratory in Switzerland, published “a universal linked information system” to help academics from across the globe run a complicated particle accelerator. Within a few years, the World Wide Web spread far beyond its first intended audience of academics and scientists. Fueled by the advent of the then-novel idea of hyperlinking, and a commitment to keep the protocols underlying the network open and free, people could share information on the internet simply by clicking a link. This idea of a decentralized and permissionless way of sharing information was revolutionary. At the time technologists were still building mainframes to store data. “There were folks who thought everything should go onto their own machines, and they invested a lot of their careers thinking everyone had to do it their way,” Berners-Lee said. “The reason why people didn’t go along with these systems is that they wanted to have their own structure and control.” Comments Share your voice Tim Berners-Lee Mandel Ngan/Getty Images Three decades ago, a young computer scientist named Tim Berners-Lee proposed an internet-based hyperlink system to allow the sharing of information among different computers, forever changing how people communicate and use the net. The idea behind what would become known as the World Wide Web was both simple and lofty, he told an audience Tuesday at an event marking the 30th anniversary of his invention. It was about letting people all over the globe collaborate to solve the world’s problems. “Imagine you have a big problem like climate change or curing cancer, but the pieces are in different people’s brains,” he said at the event, hosted by The Washington Post at its headquarters in DC. “That’s what the goal of the web was: to connect all these people.” But 30 years on, the web has been “hijacked by crooks” who could destroy it, Berners-Lee said. It’s morphed into a platform where disinformation spreads like a contagion, hate foments and personal privacy has been relinquished to the highest bidder looking to make a quick buck. Now, the 63-year-old said, he’s working to fix the online world he helped create. I’m still not a gazillionaire. But that’s fine, otherwise the web wouldn’t have existed. Tim Berners-Lee Now playing: Watch this: Internet Tim Berners-Leelast_img read more



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Sivaji Raja warns newly elected MAA president Naresh against taking oath before

first_imgSivaji Raja and NareshFacebookSivaji Raja, the president of Movie Artiste Association (MAA), reportedly threatened Naresh saying that he would move court if he holds the swearing-in ceremony before March 31.The elections for the governing body of the MAA was held in Hyderabad a week ago. Sivaji Raja and Naresh’s panels fought the polls as if they were contesting Assembly elections. Naresh’s panel finally emerged victorious and is now planning to take oath. But the fight between the two groups took an ugly twist a week after the election with Sivaji Raja not allowing Naresh to take his oath till March 31.It is reported that newly elected MAA president Naresh decided to conduct the swearing-in ceremony of his panel on March 22. When he was busy making arrangements, the team has received an objection from Sivaji Raja, who warned against taking the oath before March 31, which happens to be his last day in office as the MAA president.Along with his new panel members Jeevitha and Rajasekhar, Naresh held a press conference on Saturday to reveal the reason for holding the swearing-in ceremony early. “We were planning to conduct the ceremony on March 22 because it’s an auspicious day, after which the next one, the Ugadi festival, comes much later,” Deccan Chronicle quoted the actor as saying.Naresh said that another reason for it is the delay in the renewal of MAA members’ insurance policies, which might lead to repercussions. He added, “Also, there’s a lot of paperwork to be completed with respect to MAA’s pension and welfare schemes and insurance policies. It is very unfortunate that Mr Sivaji Raja said that he will move the court if we conduct the ceremony before March 31.”Now, Naresh has decided to seek the support of senior industry members. He said, “It is morally incorrect on Sivaji Raja’s part to ask me not to take the oath. However, with regards to the swearing-in ceremony, we are happy to follow the instructions of the elders from the MAA and the film industry.”last_img read more



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Fujitsu unveils device that lets printed paper become interactive w video

first_img © 2013 Phys.org Explore further New smart e-book system more convenient than paper-based books More information: via Diginfo Recognizing that tablet computers and smartphones have not yet made real paper obsolete, engineers at Fujitsu have created a device that allows people to use printed products in ways they’ve become accustomed to doing with electronic media. The system works by utilizing standard computer cameras, an overhead projector, image processing and electronics to run it all. In practice, it looks like a cylinder, about two feet tall that sits on the edge of a table. At the top of the cylinder is an overhang that contains the electronics, cameras and projector. To use the system, a person lays a piece of paper—or even an open book—on the table and allows the system to recognize it, which appears to happen very quickly. Next, the user reaches out a hand and extends a single finger for using as an interactive device. The system scans the finger noting its size, orientation, and even its color. This is to allow it to differentiate it from all other objects on the table. Once the system learns all it needs to know about the finger, the user can use it to highlight text on the printed page, graphics or pictures. Dragging them off to the side causes the highlighted material to be captured as a single unit and held for later use. The system also recognizes web page addresses and highlights them automatically. Tapping them with the finger causes the associated web page to be opened and stored in the area next to the printed material. It can also overlay information over the top of the printed material if desired.The engineers at Fujitsu also added another separate feature to the system that allows a user to manipulate virtual 3D objects in virtual space using their fist. At the demonstration, reps for the company indicated that the system is not yet ready for sale, but plan to make it so sometime next year. They added that they believe such technology would be very useful as a demonstration device, for travel agencies, for example, or as a way to allow users to interact with and fill out forms at governmental offices.center_img (Phys.org) —Fujitsu Laboratories has unveiled a new twist in touch-screen technology—an overhead projector/camera device that turns printed pages into interactive media. Called the Fingerlink Interaction System, it lets users highlight text or images using a single finger then drag them to one side for future use; tap on web-links and have web pages open, or use their fist to animate virtual 3D objects. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Fujitsu unveils device that lets printed paper become interactive (w/ video) (2013, April 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-04-fujitsu-unveils-device-paper-interactive.htmllast_img read more



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