San Diego based agency aims to improve the lives of homeless youth

first_img Posted: June 2, 2019 San Diego based agency aims to improve the lives of homeless youth Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom June 2, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)- A local agency is improving the lives on dozens of homeless youth here in San Diego. Director Joanne Newgard and President and Founder of Doors of Change, Jeffrey Sitcov, joined the show this morning to explain their award winning music program and their upcoming auctions event, “Taking Music and Art to the Streets.” last_img read more



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Folio Show Dives Deep Into Data on Opening Day

first_imgNew York—Data, for many years now, holds a huge stake in how advertisers and publishers operate. But a question that publishers kept asking themselves at the 2018 Folio: Show is can data dictate everything?The answer? Well, it depends.The Folio: Show hosted its second day of presentations, panels, and discussions covering the present and future of the publishing industry on Tuesday. While data has become a clear driver of what companies do from a planning perspective, nothing has replaced the onus and importance of content. And sometimes, depending on the organization, the content still can drive planning. The first panel of the day, “Power Up Your Future: Where Publishers Are Placing Their Bets to Grow,” Bonnie Kintzer, president and CEO of Trusted Media Brands, detailed the experience with Family Handyman, and how the right content can lead to new learnings, which creates new avenues for growth.The publication for do-it-yourselfers initially targeted content based on what their community told them they needed to know. This led to massive successes – such as the ‘How to Fix the Toilet,’ which is one of its most read pieces on the site. From there, Kintzer’s publication realized that this community of readers wanted more in-depth, detailed advice and they were willing to pay for it. The success of the content provided the data for expansion. From there, Family Handyman created individual, highly detailed classes, which can range from $200 to $400 a session. They have expanded further to step into B2B marketing, where their editorial knowledge within the home improvement space can be sold to industry vets.“What is it that the audience wants,” advises Kintzer. “Give it to them in the manner they want it in.”This process can be platform agnostic, added Eric Zinczenko, CEO of Bonnier. “You can continue to reach consumers on a variety of platforms,” including print, he said. But in order to take advantage of the platform–whichever you choose–you first have to have “the data and metrics” to support it.Keynote speaker, Seth Dallaire, vice president of global ad sales at Amazon, spoke more directly about the metrics during his conversation. “Insights, are the core proposition we bring to buyers,” said Dallaire. As Amazon looks to extend its reach in the advertising space, encouraging brands to extend content into their e-commerce page with Amazon’s help, it’s these insights in which Dallaire and his team are using to entice companies.While metrics have become the end-all-be-all, it isn’t the primary guide for all ideas. Every once in a while, an idea that’s too good to pass is pursued, even without the data support. These are the ideas that create truly special moments.In the late morning panel, “A Fundamental Truth: Content Is Still King,” Sam Martin, vice president of strategy and business development at Leafly, a review site for marijuana, said that he launched a $500,000 campaign to build a long-form Internet series called “Growers.” Without a distribution network – since cannabis companies can’t advertise on Facebook or Twitter – they used the legal dispensaries across the U.S. to spread the content. Many of these dispensaries have screens up all day long, and they were willing to include the show on their televisions. “It performed fairly well,” said Martin, who then added with a chuckle, “I should have tested it.”Croi McNamara, senior V.P. of video programming at Condé Nast Entertainment, said that nearly 100% of their content is driven by data. And when she joined the company, her first effort was to get rid of going after “gut projects.” Now, that the company has embraced the data driven approach, she’s more willing to look for those unique opportunities that may not have the insight to support it. Condé’s “highly selective” with the opportunities, said McNamara. “When we do make those, it works,” which is often the type of series that leads to awards.This data-led excursion within the industry had long turned many organizations away from print as digital became the primary focus for many titles. But for print publications, there isn’t this fear of data anymore. And, more importantly, much of the data is pointing their publishers back to print, which was discussed at the “What’s the Future of Print” panel in the afternoon. More publishers are viewing print as a way to cut through the clutter readers are exposed to and reach those that enjoy the magazine as a platform.“Print means something,” said Alison Overholt, editor-in-chief at ESPN The Magazine. “It means something to readers and those that are in the magazine.”Maile Carpenter, editor in chief at Food Network Magazine, explained why the company decided to launch its second title, Pioneer Woman, just last year. The brand, which started from a blog, grew into a television show on the Food Network, and then a magazine, needed a way so viewers could connect with brand off-screen, said Carpenter. The magazine added “another touch point” for interaction, beyond the show and digital content, which they can enjoy in their spare time.The issue when it comes to magazines, and all publications, is who will end up paying for the content, even as all these insights drive the next move. After over 400 conversations with advertising executives and others for his book “Frenemies,” famed author and media critic for The New Yorker and keynote speaker Ken Auletta believes that the biggest hiccup to publishing and advertising success may lie in the consumer. They’re not used to purchasing content and they don’t want to be advertised to.last_img read more



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This 1939 Bentley Corniche is brand new and absolutely gorgeous



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Flipkart initiates aggressive tech hiring Is it going Amazon way

first_imgFlipkart initiates aggressive tech hiring: Is it going Amazon way?REUTERS/Abhishek N ChinnappaIndia’s homegrown e-commerce giant Flipkart is increasing its headcount in areas of data science and analytics among other specializations.Flipkart has over 700 open positions in technology and related areas including data scientists, UI & UX designers, product solution engineers, tech program managers, software developers, IT infrastructure & service delivery and IT applications, says an Economic Times report.”Flipkart is aggressively hiring in tech functions. Over 4/5th of all current open positions at Flipkart is for technology functions,” Economic Times quotes a spokesperson for Flipkart as saying.”Aggressive tech hiring is part of the company’s ‘AI for India’ programme, which leverages Flipkart’s strengths in tech and data to build scalable AI-powered solutions for the country” the spokesperson added. Flipkart has kept about 50 data sciences positions open.It seems like Flipkart is following the Amazon suit who are reportedly hiring over 1100 people for its Alexa business unit. The company is looking out for Language Engineer to join their Alexa Machine Learning Team.According to a report by Citi Research, the company is hiring more than Google for its technical and product roles across the entire Alphabet group of companies including YouTube and Waymo.As the talks about hiring by Flipkart intensify, it is interesting to note that Flipkart is planning to invest in setting up a 4.5 million sqft state-of-the-art logistics park in Karnataka state which aims to create 20,000 jobs. The logistics park includes the direct recruitment of 5,000 people while 15,000 jobs would be created indirectly.Also, the US retail giant Walmart is now said to be nearing closure of a deal with Flipkart by which the Walmart will acquire a major share in Flipkart through the secondary purchase of shares from existing shareholders apart from making investments through the primary route.last_img read more



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5 Immigration Stories To Watch In 2018

first_imgCharles Reed/APArrests by Immigration and Customs Enforcement are up more than 40 percent since January.During his first year in office, President Trump has taken a strikingly different approach to immigration policy than his predecessors.“We haven’t had an administration that saw immigration primarily as a burden and a threat to the country,” said Andrew Selee, president of the Migration Policy Institute in Washington. He thinks most Americans disagree with the White House about that. Still, Selee thinks the administration is “driving the conversation in new ways we hadn’t seen under Republicans or Democrats before.”In its first year, the Trump administration delivered a broad crackdown on illegal immigration, and new limits on legal migration. Arrests by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement are up more than 40 percent since January, while fewer immigrants are trying to cross illegally at the southern border. Refugee resettlement is at its lowest level since Congress created the current framework in 1980.“It’s a 180 degree turn from the policies of the Obama administration,” says Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies, which favors lower levels of immigration. “It’s sending a message that the U.S. is taking its immigration laws seriously.”Some of the administration’s most ambitious goals, however, have been blocked by the courts, or stymied by Congress.Here’s a look at five major immigration stories to watch in 2018.1. DACAJose Luis Magana/APKaren Caudillo, 21, of Florida and Jairo Reyes, 25, of Rogers, Ark., both brought to the U.S. as children, attend a Capitol Hill news conference in September in WashingtonThe Trump administration is moving to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, better known as DACA, leaving thousands of so-called DREAMers in limbo.The Obama-era program protects about 700,000 young people who were brought illegally to the U.S. as children, shielding them from deportation and allowing them to work legally. Those protections have already begun to expire for some, with thousands of DREAMers potentially at risk of deportation starting in March.Polls show widespread support for allowing DREAMers to stay in the country, but a permanent fix has been elusive as Congress and the White House try to hammer out the details.2. Travel banBrendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty ImagesOpponents of President Trump’s travel ban protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this month. Legal challenges to the ban are likely to eventually reach the high court.The administration scored a long-sought victory when the Supreme Court allowed the latest version of the president’s travel ban to take effect pending the outcome of several legal challenges.Lower courts had blocked much of this travel ban, as well as earlier versions, partly because of concerns that they discriminate against Muslims. The latest travel ban covers many (though not all) travelers from six majority-Muslim countries, plus North Koreans and government officials from Venezuela.One appeals court has already found that the president exceeded his legal authority; a second appeals court will rule soon. An appeal to the Supreme Court is all but certain to follow.3. Border wallGuillermo Arias/AFP/Getty ImagesPrototypes for President Trump’s proposed wall at the U.S./Mexico border were put up earlier this year near San Diego, Calif.This was arguably Trump’s signature issue on the campaign trail, and a reliable applause line at his big public rallies this year.But progress has been slow.The administration has commissioned prototypes near the southern border outside San Diego. But Congress has yet to appropriate any money for construction. On the campaign trail, Trump promised to make Mexico pay for the wall, but officials there have said several times they will not do so.Critics have questioned the need for the wall in the first place, especially since the number of immigrants trying to cross the border illegally has fallen to the lowest level in decades.4. Sanctuary citiesEric Gay/APOpponents of an anti-sanctuary city bill in Texas march in San Antonio in JunePresident Trump signed an executive order intended to punish so-called “sanctuary cities” that limit their cooperation with immigration authorities. Several of those cities pushed back, arguing that the administration can’t withhold federal money to coerce them into changing their immigration policies.So far, courts have ruled against the Trump administration. A federal judge in California issued an injunction partially blocking the executive order in a case brought by San Francisco and Santa Clara County. Judges in Chicago and Philadelphia also ruled against the administration.This is a battle that’s likely headed to appeals courts in the new year.5. Employer crackdownSo far, the administration’s enforcement efforts have focused mostly on immigrants themselves, not on employers who hire undocumented workers.Trump administration officials say that will change next year. But past administrations found that workplace raids carried a high political price. The new year may reveal whether the White House has the stomach for a fight with the pro-business wing of the Republican Party.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more



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Intel lines up 14 Ivy Bridge processors

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) — A new lineup of 14 Ivy Bridge processors are out of the bag from Intel. Thursday’s announcement by Intel involves new processors for mobile computers and desktops, but special attention is focused on four of those processors, which are destined for the Ultrabooks market. Intel made Ivy Bridge news last month with an announcement of quad-core parts destined for high-end laptops and desktops. The newest crop includes dual-core parts catering to more market segments, Explore further Intel introduces first batch of Ivy Bridge processors © 2012 Phys.Org Citation: Intel lines up 14 Ivy Bridge processors (2012, June 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-intel-lines-ivy-bridge-processors.html Of the group of processors, six are desktop-grade. The rest are mobile, and four are the ultra-low voltage. They will carry a U at the end of their name. The new processor announcement is well timed as days ahead of the planned debut of new Ultrabook devices powered by Ivy Bridge processors, which will make their debut at Computex Taipei 2012. Some Ultrabooks sporting Intel’s latest Ivy Bridge Core processors will start to go on sale, including models with touchscreens.The ultra-light computers carrying the Intel name will be promoted aggressively. Intel sources say that the number of Ultrabook type machines, about 11, on the market today, will grow to over 110 designs in the pipeline. Some of the touchscreen Ultrabooks will be convertible, whereas the laptops can be turned into tablets. To support success, Intel has had to invest on processor technology that can elevate Ultrabooks. Intel Ivy Bridge designers have improved battery life and they have enhanced some security features. Intel technologists also say that they have raised the bar on specs to define a device that can become a third-generation Intel Core-based Ultrabook device. A revised definition of what it takes to build an Ultrabook includes requirements affecting performance, mechanical design, battery life and processor component characteristics for an Ultrabook. The third-generation Intel Core Ultrabook devices wake up from deep sleep state to full use (keyboard interaction) in less than seven seconds and are able to wake from sleep mode fast. They will load and run favorite applications quickly. Ultrabook devices must offer at least five hours of battery life, while many meet the recommended level of eight hours-plus. Ultrabook devices based on the new processors must have either USB 3 or Thunderbolt technology to enable rapid transfer capabilities. Also, the Ultrabook systems use chip-level authentication similar to hardware tokens.last_img read more



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