SKA South Africa, IBM to ‘go big’ in space

first_img7 March 2012 Square Kilometre Array (SKA) South Africa has announced plans to work with multinational tech giant IBM to develop a next-generation “big data” platform for analyzing massive volumes of radio astronomy data, allowing astronomers to observe objects in space more effectively. In a statement on Wednesday, SKA South Africa said the proposed joint research project would combine available radio astronomy analysis software with machine-learning techniques currently under development at IBM Research. “Processing big data volumes, whether from scientific instruments, environmental sensors, or international communication and commerce, will require extreme automation and self-learning capability by the software of the future,” SKA South Africa said. “Beginning with components from IBM’s Infosphere software for big data and IBM’s SPSS software for predictive analysis, the initial phase is intended to programme computers to self-learn, adapt, and fine-tune the analysis of radio telescope data under the watchful eye of an astronomer.”Africa vies for Square Kilometre Array South Africa, allied with eight other African countries, is competing against Australia (allied with New Zealand) to host the €1.5-billion Square Kilometre Array, an instrument 50-100 times more sensitive and 10 000 times faster than any radio imaging telescope yet built. The international science funding agencies and governments involved in the international SKA consortium are due to make an announcement – possibly on the final winning bid – on 4 April, with construction likely to start in 2016 and take place in phases over several years, with completion by about 2022. South Africa is currently building a 64-dish precursor instrument for the SKA, the Karoo Array Telescope (also known as the MeerKAT) which, regardless of whether South Africa wins the SKA bid, will be a powerful scientific instrument in its own right – as will Australia’s SKA precursor, the 36-dish Pathfinder, which is currently under construction.Massive data analysis – the challenge for SKA The analysis of MeerKAT and Pathfinder data will be a major challenge – and solving this challenge would overcome a major hurdle for the SKA, whose data rates will be huge, rivaling the world’s internet traffic. The MeerKAT, the Pathfinder, and following them the SKA, will generate massive volumes of data that will need to be combined to make detailed images of radio emission from distant objects like black holes, spinning neutron stars, planets, galaxies – even primeval gases that existed before the galaxies were formed, as observed at the edge of the visible universe. “A number of subtle effects need to be corrected to make clear and accurate images from interferometers like MeerKAT,” says SKA South Africa’s Dr Jasper Horrell. “These include variations in the instrument itself [as well as] effects such as those introduced by the earth’s ionosphere. ‘More intelligent software is needed’ “More intelligent software is needed to enable astronomers to process and analyze the enormous data rates that will be produced by MeerKAT and future radio telescopes,” says Horrell. The current method of analysis requires direct interaction with a computer for hours or days before the images can be used for research purposes. This practice is not only time-consuming, but it also requires experienced astronomers, making the radio sky accessible to only a few experts. The proposed project with IBM would aim to “to teach a computer to make perfect images on its own,” says Dr Alain Biem, an IBM Researcher who specializes in exploratory stream analytics. “A software platform like this may assist in enabling large survey instruments like MeerKAT to process the trillions of bits of data per second they receive and make it available to astronomers around the world.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more



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Windows Phone, Still An Underdog, Comes Out Swinging In A New Ad

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology brian s hall Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts Windows Phone got some good news and some bad news today from the consumer research firm Kantar. The bad: Microsoft’s smartphone OS accounted for a meager 5.6% of all U.S. smartphone sales in the first quarter. The comparable number for Android was 49%; for iOS, 44%.The good: Windows Phone’s showing was a significant improvement, up a full 1.9 percentage points over a year earlier. By contrast, Blackberry — which is rolling out its new operating system, BlackBerry 10 — saw its U.S. share crater in the quarter to less than 1% from 3.7% a year ago. In a statement, Kantar analyst Mary-Ann Paralto noted that Windows Phone is “now at its highest sales share figure” ever in the U.S. Possibly in anticipation of the good news, Microsoft has just released a new Windows Phone commercial. It doesn’t show off the platform nor offer any reason why Windows Phone is a better choice than its rivals. Rather, it takes a page from Samsung and mocks both iPhone and Android users. Tags:#Android#iPhone#Microsoft#Windows Phone When you’re far behind in the market, casting yourself as a viable alternative to the market leaders — while simultaneously mocking said leaders — can be a winning strategy. Or, you know, it can smack of desperation.In this case, however, the ad is so over-the-top, and Microsoft appears to be having so much fun making fun of iPhone and Android users, that it works. Android users are silly hipsters. iPhone users are old. Siri doesn’t work. Samsung devices are ridiculously large.Will the ad help Microsoft sell more Windows Phone phones? Doubtful.The problem is that the ad is focused on the wrong audience: current iPhone and Android users. Even at the end, Microsoft says, “don’t fight, switch.” Only, those existing users aren’t Microsoft’s logical target. Microsoft needs to target folks who haven’t yet chosen a side — that is, owners of non-smartphones (what the industry, for its own unfathomable reasons, calls “feature phones”). The Kantar survey noted as much (emphasis added): Windows strength appears to be the ability to attract first time smartphone buyers, upgrading from a featurephone. Of those who changed their phone over the last year to a Windows smartphone, 52% had previously owned a featurephone.  Building market share based on getting iPhone and Android users to switch is likely not a winning strategy, at least not yet. An analysis of U.S. smartphone owners, for example, found that 91% of current iPhone owners planned to stay with the platform — and the majority of those who were likely to switch planned to switch to Android. A smaller, though still sizable 76% of Android users planned to stay with the platform. Most of those likely to switch intend to get an iPhone, not Windows Phone.But there’s no reason to expect the rational from Microsoft — not when it’s so far behind. With the new mocking ad, and the large gap between Windows Phone and leaders iPhone and Android, expect Microsoft’s marketing to become even more aggressive and in-your-face.Earlier this year, founder Bill Gates publicly stated he was not pleased with Microsoft’s mobile device sales and he characterized the company’s smartphone strategy as a “mistake.” That no doubt lit a fire under Steve Ballmer and company. Who knows, maybe the scenes inside Microsoft’s Redmond headquarters are as acrimonious as those in its newest commercial. Along with the U.S., Kantar tracks smartphone sales data in 9 countries, including China, Australia, Japan, France and Great Britain. Now that Symbian has been effectively deprecated, Windows Phone appears set to take third place — a very distant third place — in all of them, with the possible exception of Japan.  Lead image from Windows Phone video Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementlast_img read more



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10 months agoREVEALED: Woodward sacked Mourinho over threats of four Man Utd players

first_imgREVEALED: Woodward sacked Mourinho over threats of four Man Utd playersby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United management were facing a players’ revolt before sacking Jose Mourinho, it has been claimed.The Mirror says up to four members of the squad threatened executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward they would turn in transfer requests if Mourinho was still in charge during next month’s winter window.It’s understood that Woodward decided to act as he was genuinely concerned about some of the Old Trafford giants’ leading names trying to force their way out of the club.Mourinho was axed on Tuesday morning less than 48 hours after a 3-1 defeat at Liverpool that left United a staggering 19 points adrift of their bitter rivals, who top the Premier League table.Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has replaced Mourinho on an interim basis until the end of the season. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more



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10 months agoLeicester boss Claude Puel hails unity for Chelsea shock

first_imgLeicester boss Claude Puel hails unity for Chelsea shockby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City boss Claude Puel hailed their unity for victory at Chelsea.Jamie Vardy scored the only goal of the game early in the second half.“We played this game with confidence and the right mentality away at Chelsea, a good team with great players,” Puel said at full-time.“In this game, we played with a fantastic togetherness. Perhaps in the first half, we were disappointed because we could have used the ball with more quality.“We wasted some good opportunities in the first half but our togetherness and our defensive aspect was fantastic. We scored a goal with a fantastic move and I was happy for Jamie.“It was a clinical goal and fantastic service from Maddy [James Maddison] also. We continued to defend like a team with 11 players with the mentality to keep this result.”That togetherness – which saw all players put their bodies on the line to defend in the latter moments – was the most pleasing factor for Puel to reflect on in his post-match assessment.“It’s a fantastic reward for the team because we managed this game very well,” Puel added. “We were a little lucky in the end when they hit the post, but I am happy for the players.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more



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Nova Scotia education bill subject to heavy criticism in committee hearing

first_imgHALIFAX – Proposed legislation that would radically change the administration of Nova Scotia’s school system was derided as “undemocratic” and “unneeded” Monday as critics lined up to condemn the bill before a legislature committee.More than 60 speakers were scheduled to make presentations before the law amendments committee on Bill 72, which would largely implement reforms recommended in a recent report by education consultant Avis Glaze.Among other things, the legislation would eliminate the province’s seven English language school boards while revamping the membership of the 9,600-member Nova Scotia Teachers Union to remove about 1,000 principals, vice-principals and senior supervisors.Union president Liette Doucet called on the government to remove provisions that would shift administrators from the union to an affiliated association.“This is punishment, pure and simple, for the strong role that principals, vice-principals and administrators have played in the NSTU since its inception, up to and including work-to-rule last year and the first provincewide strike of the NSTU,” said Doucet.She said the change would rob school administrators of basic protections, including the right to challenge discharges, suspensions or demotions for just cause.It was a change of tone from last week when Doucet said there was hope of a new start for the union’s relationship with the government. On Monday, she said trust would once again be an issue if the legislation is passed as is.“We can never trust that a collective agreement — a contract — is worth any more than the paper it’s written on. This government’s strong-arm approach to unions and collective bargaining has the potential to destroy collective bargaining in this province for the foreseeable future.”Peter Day, a middle school teacher from Sydney Mines, N.S., said there was nothing in the legislation that would improve student achievement.“The recommendations of the Glaze report are a fabricated solution to a crisis in education that does not exist,” he said, adding that the closing of school boards was “an attack on democracy.”Day said more human resources — including teachers, speech language pathologists and social workers — would make a bigger difference in schools than administrative changes.Suzy Hansen, a member of the Halifax Regional School Board, told the committee she opposes the elimination of boards as an African Nova Scotian with six children in the school system.Hansen said she was worried about the unintended consequences on “the achievement gap” between the academic performance of African Nova Scotian children and other students.“We are unaware of what policies are going to be kept and what aren’t going to be kept,” said Hansen. “There definitely are things that need to be addressed, but doing a clean sweep and an abrupt change so quickly is not going to help. It’s only going to push us back further.”While most of the early speakers before the committee spoke against the legislation, consultant Paul Bennett spoke in favour of it, although he said it could be improved.Under the legislation, the Acadian school board would remain in place, while the other boards would be replaced by a new Provincial Advisory Council of Education composed of 15 members representing all regions of the province.School board offices would remain in place, but they would become regional education centres that would continue to make regional and local decisions, although the superintendents would report to the deputy minister of education. There would also be local advisory councils under the proposed model.“I think you need to consider the regional centres and the executive directors of education. I really don’t think they are going to be sufficiently strong to represent the public,” Bennett said.He said regional school advisory councils should be governing bodies to make them more accountable.“Phase out the school boards, yes — decentralize decision making, restore democratic accountability and we’ll all be further ahead,” he said.Meanwhile, a small group of protesters gathered outside the legislature to call on the government to pause the legislation.“Nova Scotia is losing 57 elected women and removing African Nova Scotian and Indigenous voices from local decision-making,” the group said in a news release.The legislation could pass final reading as early as Wednesday.last_img read more



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Peter Mukerjea ‘silent killer’ of Sheena Bora: CBI tells court

first_imgMumbai: Former media executive Peter Mukerjea is the “silent killer” of Sheena Bora, the daughter of his wife Indrani Mukerjea from a previous relationship, the CBI told a special court on Friday while opposing his bail plea in the 2012 murder case.Peter Mukerjea, arrested in the sensational Sheena Bora murder case in 2015, had moved the bail application in November last year before special CBI Judge J C Jagdale. This is the third time he has approached the court for bail. Also Read – How a psychopath killer hid behind the mask of a devout laity!Opposing his bail plea, special public prosecutor Bharat Badami argued that the CBI has sufficient evidence to prove Peter Mukerjea’s role in the murder conspiracy. Badami told the court Peter Mukerjea didn’t take any step to find Sheena Bora, who had gone missing, despite the fact that she was his son Rahul Mukerjea’s fiancee. “Peter was knowing everything…he was not a statue of the family. He took no step when Rahul was desperately asking about Sheena….. Peter is silent killer of Sheena,” the CBI lawyer said. Rahul Mukerjea is yet to depose before the court and if Peter Mukerjea is released on bail, he may try to win over the witness (Rahul), the lawyer added. Also Read – Encounter under way in Pulwama, militant killedBadami argued there was sufficient material against Peter Mukerjea that led to framing of charges against him. Therefore, the accused cannot seek bail by merely stating the charges against him were “defective”, he said. One of the reasons forwarded by Peter Mukerjea for not being involved in the Sheena’s murder was that he was in London when the murder took place. However, the CBI contested this argument. Hafiz Saeed (LeT chief) was in Pakistan when the 26/11 Mumbai attacks took place, but that doesn’t mean he wasn’t involved in the attacks. So, even if Peter Mukerjea was in London (at the time of the murder) it doesn’t mean he was not part of the criminal conspiracy, the CBI counsel argued. The April 2012 murder of Sheena Bora (24), Indrani Mukerjea’s daughter from an earlier relationship, came to light in August 2015 when her driver Shyamvar Rai spilled the beans after being arrested in another case. Indrani Mukerjea, a former media executive, her former husband Sanjeev Khanna, Rai and Peter Mukerjea were arrested in the case. Rai later became an approver and was pardoned.last_img read more



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Man held with pistol, bullets at airport

first_imgKolkata: A Chennai-bound man has been apprehended at the airport here for allegedly carrying a pistol and live bullets, a CISF official said Friday. B K Munda, a resident of Jharkhand, was going through security checks at the Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose International Airport when a Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) personnel detected the weapon and seven bullets in his hand baggage, said the official. “A .32 bore calibre pistol and seven live bullets were recovered from the man. He has been handed over to the police as he could not produce valid documents for carrying the firearm and ammunition,” he added. The man was supposed to take a flight to Chennai, he said, adding the passenger was booked under relevant sections of the Arms Act.last_img



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WTO’s dispute system collapse to hit developing nations: India

first_imgNew Delhi: India Monday said collapse of appellate body of WTO’s dispute settlement system, and the reform agenda being pushed by certain developed economies could harm the interest of developing countries. The issues were flagged by India on the first day of a meeting of senior officials of 22 members of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) here. Speaking at the inaugural session, Commerce Secretary Anup Wadhawan said there are existential challenges to the multilateral rules-based trading system due to spate of unilateral measures and counter steps being taken by certain countries. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: IcraBesides, deadlock in key areas of negotiations and impasse in the appointment of members of WTO’s appellate body are posing challenges. “The logjam in the appellate body is a serious threat to the dispute settlement mechanism of the WTO and the implementation function of the organisation,” an official statement said quoting the secretary. He said the continuous rise in protectionist measures is vitiating the global economic environment and this “situation does not bode well for developing countries, including the LDCs (least developed countries)”. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 daysWadhawan said LDCs and developing countries like India would face more harm due to the impasse over appointment of members in the WTO’s appellate body, which is a critical part of trade dispute settlement system. “There is an urgent need to engage constructively to preserve the system and come up with constructive solutions to the problem,” he said. The delay in appointment of members in the appellate body would hamper its functioning. The US has blocked the appointment of these members. The minimum quorum (3) for functioning of this body will end on December 10, after which it will become dysfunctional. He also said the situation in the WTO has spurred a strong discourse for reforming the WTO, which unfortunately is characterised by a complete lack of balance. “The reform agenda being promoted does not address the concerns of the developing countries,” he said adding the discussions in the meeting being held here give a chance to reaffirm the resolve to keep development at the centre of the reform agenda. The reform initiatives must promote inclusiveness and non-discrimination, build trust and address the inequalities and glaring asymmetries in existing agreements, he added. The secretary said there has been no active engagement or movement on key issues of concerns for developing countries including LDCs in the negotiating agenda of the WTO. “Agriculture remains a key priority for a large membership of WTO representing the developing world. However, there is a strong push to completely relegate existing mandates, decisions and work done for the past many years, to the background,” he said. He called upon the LDCs and developing countries to collectively work for a fair and equitable agreement on fisheries subsidies. That agreement should take into consideration the livelihood needs of subsistence fishermen and protect the policy space to develop capacities for harnessing marine resources, he said. “India believes that developing countries need to work together to protect their interests in the WTO negotiations through preservation of the core fundamental principles of the WTO,” the secretary said. The two-day meeting gives an opportunity to the participating countries to develop a shared WTO reform proposal on issues of priority and interest for developing countries. This will help in building a common narrative on issues of importance for developing countries and LDCs, he said. The issues which would come up in the meeting include finding a solution to the ongoing impasse in the appellate body on an urgent basis; ways to reinvigorate negotiating agenda on issues of critical importance for developing countries; and ensuring effective, special and differential treatment for all developing countries including LDCs. The discussions of the senior officials will feed into the ministers’ deliberations Tuesday. The meeting is being attended by six LDCs and 16 developing countries, including China, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Argentina, Bangladesh, Malaysia, and Nigeria, according to a commerce ministry statement. World Trade Organisation (WTO) Director General Roberto Azevedo is also participating. The meeting is being held at a time when the multilateral rule-based trading system is facing serious challenges. The meeting also assumes significance as countries like the US and China are raising import duties against each other’s products, creating a trade war like situation and posing a threat to global commerce. Developed countries like the US want WTO members to start discussing new issues like e-commerce. However, India is of the view that formal discussions should begin only after consensus is built on them.last_img read more



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Crew goalkeeper making voice heard on field

In soccer, the goalkeeper is like a coach on the field. “Part of being a goalkeeper is barking out orders and you’ve got to be louder than everyone,” Columbus Crew goalkeeper William Hesmer said. He is in charge of directing the team’s defense and setting up its offense with goal kicks and throws. Hesmer, now in his fifth season as the Crew’s starting goalkeeper, is off to a hot start in 2011. Through 10 games, he is allowing an average of only one goal per contest and has had four shutouts, putting him on pace to break his career high of 10. “That’s a reflection of the team,” he said of his performance so far. “For the most part, we have done a terrific job of team-defending and making it difficult for other teams to break us down.” After losing several key players in the offseason, such as defender Frankie Hejduk and offensive maestro Guillermo Barros Schelotto, coach Robert Warzycha said Hesmer has increased his role as a team leader. “Losing so many players from last year, he is one of the guys that is leading the team,” Warzycha said. “His good performance is very important to us.” As successful as Hesmer and the Crew defense have been so far, the offense has struggled during the first two months of the season. Columbus is in last place in the MLS in scoring, averaging 0.8 goals per game. Strong performances by Hesmer and Co. during the first month and a half of the season, including a streak of four straight shutouts, made up for the team’s offensive struggles. The Crew recorded a seven-game streak without a loss from March 26 to May 7. At that point, the team had 13 points and was tied for fifth in the 18-team league. However, the team has gone goalless in its past two matches and has yet to win a game in May. It fell into a tie for 10th place in the league. Warzycha said there’s one thing his team needs to do: score goals. “It is as simple as that,” he said. The Crew will look to rebound against Chivas USA at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at home. read more



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Opinion Despite World Cup exit American soccer gaining momentum respect

Justen Woody, left, and Robert Driskill both of Fort Worth, Texas, cheer at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, as soccer fans watch the World Cup soccer match between the USA and Belgium on July 1. Belgium advanced, 2-1, in extra time.Credit: Courtesy of MCTSeldom does a defeat in international sport command the “respect” of a victorious opponent.“Two words.. TIM HOWARD#Respect#BelUSA,” Belgian captain Vincent Kompany tweeted less than an hour after his national team secured a Round of 16 World Cup win against the United States, 2-1, in extra time Tuesday.Kompany wasn’t just being a gracious winner, though.Howard, the U.S. goalkeeper, notched a World Cup record 16 saves in the contest against Belgium.FIFA only started officially recording saves statistically in 1966, but I think we can still revel in the fact that an American is on top of the record books in at least one category in soccer.An American record in international soccer, a sport that doesn’t even get a place on the podium of our national sports.Far more will come from the tournament run the U.S. just engineered than simply one memory of a titanic performance between the posts.A defeat that marked the second-straight Cup where Team USA has been knocked out of contention after getting to the elimination stage — an achievement by itself — may seem indicative to many that soccer just isn’t our thing.We can’t win the big one, right? Just like poor old Marty Schottenheimer when the NFL playoffs used to roll around for him. To those underwhelmed by and uninvolved in supporting the sport of soccer stateside, the loss to Belgium probably triggered eyerolls and shrugs of indifference.“The U.S. got just as far as it did in 2010 and fell flat on its face again? Not surprised,” says John Q. Indifferent.What the average soccer detractor doesn’t realize is the American squad showed in defeat that, while Europe’s elite teams may still be able to get the best of them, they’re just barely getting away with it in 2014.Even judging purely from this four-game World Cup résumé, the U.S. has shown it can hang with some of the greatest teams in the world for 90 minutes. Maybe even for 120 minutes, if need be, as was the case Tuesday at the Arena Fonte Nova.By managing to emerge from what was colloquially billed the “Group of Death” when FIFA announced the 32-team draw, Team USA defied both expectation and superstition.Experts widely predicted the U.S. to flounder against titans of the beautiful game and finish fourth out of four.Instead of wilting at the prospect of taking on nemesis Ghana, fourth-ranked Portugal and second-ranked Germany, the U.S. stepped up to the challenge and advanced as group G’s runner-up.They’d beaten a Ghana team that outplayed them for 85 minutes by a tally of 2-1. The win was worth far more to U.S. Soccer than just the three points it afforded them in the standings, though.Vanquishing the Black Stars — the team to send the U.S. home in 2006 and 2010 — eradicated talk of a curse of ineptitude, of an inability to win high-stakes matches.Fittingly, the unlikeliest of heroes won the day.Defender John Brooks, just 21 years old, unexpectedly saw playing time as a substitute at halftime because of an injury to defender Matt Besler. Brooks was making his fifth Team USA appearance when he took the field.For context, the Ghana game was captain Clint Dempsey’s 105th cap for the red, white and blue.Spotlight jitters? Please. Brooks scored the game-winner — his first international goal — in the 86th minute and put away the talented African opposition.The U.S. tied a stacked Portugal side that’s led by one of the world’s premier athletes in forward Cristiano Ronaldo, whom the defense stifled for most of the game.Let me say that again.When supposedly second-rate USA can restrict one of the best footballers on the planet to seven shots, 20 passes and one assist on the biggest of stages of international athletic competition, well, that doesn’t sound very second rate to me.In fact, the U.S. had a win nearly in hand. Portuguese midfielder Silvestre Varela’s goal off an admittedly impeccable cross by Ronaldo in the 95th minute for the tying score broke American hearts. Fans were devastated because advancement out of the group stage of the cup had been guaranteed with a win that proved suddenly elusive with 30 seconds left to play.But that’s the point. People cared. Finally, people cared and had a vested interest in how this soccer team, their soccer team, was faring.I took in the Portugal game at Fado Irish Pub in Columbus’ Easton Town Center, and what had been a joyous scene in the waning moments became a maudlin and crestfallen one when the Varela goal went in.The joy got sapped out of the room and I saw hands clutch heads and jaws drop.Disbelieving sighs and bewildered profanities showed me that people had taken ownership of this U.S. team with their full being.But I can tell you that people being absolutely crushed by a draw against one of the world’s football powers is an impressive and telling statement about how far this sport has come.Better yet, that we legitimately expect to win against one of the world’s football powers — and get vocally and visibly upset when we don’t — is proof that American soccer is on the upswing.As former national team star and ESPN analyst Alexi Lalas said moments after the Belgium game, “This loss, it’s gonna hurt. But tomorrow morning we’ll wake up, and I think that this team has provided a glimpse of the fact that there is a soccer culture in the United States. And it’s vibrant and it’s passionate, and ultimately, it will lead us to win a World Cup.”It’s a bold statement to end on. But millions of fans going nuts in parks, plazas and stadiums across the country while watching the U.S. on jumbotrons and projection screens are inclined to agree with Lalas.“I believe that we will win,” they chanted vibrantly, passionately. Even when it didn’t come true against Belgium, they still believed.Ultimately, the point to take away from this U.S. World Cup run and the years of progress that led up to it is linked to what Vincent Kompany earnestly told his Twitter followers Tuesday night.American soccer is alive and well, and it deserves your respect. read more



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