Now Fairmont guests can watch the F1 races while s

first_imgNow Fairmont guests can watch the F1 races while seated in the comfortable pedicure chairs that overlook the famous hairpin turn of the Grand Prix. Like no other spa in Monaco, and inspired by the magical light and colors of this luxurious Principality, with touches of sparkling sea glass throughout, this newest Willow Stream Spa captures the sea-inspiring energy of the Mediterranean. With specialized treatments like the Monaco Power of the Sea and Reflections of Cyan, this spa is a part of the 45-million-euro refurbishment of the hotel and offers authentic, personalized experiences with a fitness centre and roof deck all located on the sixth and seventh floors of The Fairmont Monte Carlo. For centuries, artists have been inspired by the color and light of this region and upon living or visiting this beautiful region, one can hear daily conversations about the magical colors of the mountains, sunrise, sunset and sea.Inspired by the Energy and Magic of Monte Carlo:Drenched in the amazing colors of Monaco, the spa is complete with eight generously-sized treatment rooms and a manicure/pedicure nail spa all awash in the deepest of sea greens and aquamarine to the coolest of sapphire and cyan. Approximately 900 m² of spacious natural light; this is the newest spa destination from the international award-winning spa brand. Designed by the acclaimed architectural firm, Wilson Associates, and a part of the 45-million-euro renovation of the hotel, this light and airy spa includes two couples experience suites with double tubs, double steam showers and overhead rain showers as well as an authentic hamman and experiential showers in the men’s lounge area. The ladies lounge is the perfect place for friends to gather and socialize over healthy bento box lunches while at the spa. The spa also has treatment suites where the perfect solo escape allows guests to design their very own personalized experience like the Monte Carlo Sea Escape in their very own private spa, all alone.Authentic Personalized Spa Experiences:A visit to the Willow Stream Spa at Fairmont Monte Carlo for a personalized facial and soothing body experience is the ideal way to relax after a day of strolling and shopping Monte-Carlo’s Carré d’Or.Offering the best energizing spa experiences in Monte Carlo, guests will enjoy treatments like the 90-minute Monte Carlo Select Facial, an aromatic sensory facial experience with skin-silkening benefits; and the detoxifying Monaco Power of the Sea which includes Kerstin Florian International’s thalasso kur and body wrap rich with re-mineralizing sea algae.The Princess Rose Retreat at Willow Stream is 90-minutes of pure indulgence. The experience begins with a gentle dry brush exfoliation to stimulate the skin and improve circulation, followed by a bath infused with chamomile and rose petals. The experience culminates with a soothing massage and wrap with Rose Geranium and Rose Flower Oil. This experience is pure indulgence, for the skin and the mind.Also new are Willow Stream’s Aromatherapy Massages from the experts at Aromatherapy Associates. These customized, made-to-order massages are inspired by the colors of Monaco and can help to clear the mind (Reflections of Magenta); uplift the spirits (Reflections of Midnight Blue); induce deep relaxation and a peaceful night’s sleep (Reflections of Cyan); aid in muscle relaxation (Reflections of Royal Purple) as well as help guests breathe more clearly (Reflections of Indigo).Willow Stream Fitness & Pool:With energizing views of the Riviera Coastline and Mediterranean Sea, the Fitness Centre features High tech TechnoGym Excite™ cardiovascular and fitness equipment which is designed with personal entertainment stations, Ipod plug-ins and motivational goal-oriented programming. The private studio is ideal for aerobic, stretch and yoga classes that will ignite Fairmont guests’ energy. Willow Stream also offers personalized coaching with experienced personal trainers that inspire guests to maximize the benefits of their workout sessions.The roof top pool renovation invites guests to gaze out on the Mediterranean Sea, Monte-Carlo’s Belle Époque Opera and Casino and the celebrated Fairmont Monte Carlo Grand Prix hairpin turn, the most challenging in the F1 Championship. L’Horizon Deck, Restaurant and Champagne Bar include more than 140 pool-side chaise-lounges, plus love bubbles, lounge area and pool bar.Each Willow Stream spa is dedicated to creating energizing spa experiences. A growing brand of healthy lifestyle spas, Willow Stream inspires living with abundant energy, which in turn makes spa guests feel fantastic. The spa brand has distinguished itself from other hotel and resort spas by personalizing each spa experience and spa visit.No two Willow Stream Spas are alike. Willow Stream has eleven signature locations –Fairmont Scottsdale (Arizona), The Fairmont Turnberry Isle Resort & Club (Florida), The Fairmont Banff Springs (Alberta, Canada), The Fairmont Empress (Victoria, British Columbia), The Fairmont Southampton (Bermuda), The Fairmont Acapulco Princess (Mexico), The Fairmont Dubai (United Arab Emirates), Fairmont Mayakoba in the heart of the Riviera Maya near Playa del Carmen, Fairmont Le Montreux Palace (Montreux, Switzerland) Fairmont Singapore (Asia) and Fairmont Monte Carlo (Monaco). Guests can learn more about each spa at www.willowstream.com.Opening in 2009/2010 and beyond, Willow Stream Spas at: Fairmont Beijing, China; Fairmont Nile City, Cairo, Egypt; Fairmont Zimbali Resort, South Africa; Fairmont Yancheng Lake, Kunshan, China ; Fairmont Creek Side, Abu Dhabi, UAE; Fairmont Fujairah, UAE ; Fairmont Hyderabad, India ; Fairmont Jaipur, India ; Fairmont Pacific Rim, Vancouver, Canada; Fairmont Grand Hotel Kyiv, Ukraine ; Fairmont The Wave, Muscat, Oman ; Fairmont Marina City, Abu Dhabi, UAE ; Fairmont Kingdom of Sheba, Palm Jumeirah, UAE ; Fairmont Haitang Bay Resort, Sanya China and Fairmont Marrakech, Moroccowww.fairmont.com.last_img read more



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Has a new mutation in the Ebola virus made it deadlier

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Working with a team led by Jeremy Luban from the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, Sabeti and co-workers sequenced samples from 1489 West African patients and analyzed them. By March 2014—about the time the epidemic was detected, but some 3 months after the first case actually occurred—the sequences had split into two distinct lineages, one of which was characterized by a single amino acid change in a region of the virus’s surface protein and allows it to bind to cells. The mutant, Luban says, “completely supplanted the ancestral virus.”The big question, of course, is whether the mutation could help the virus spread. The researchers did not have access to a biosafety level (BSL) 4 laboratory necessary to test that with the real Ebola virus, so they engineered harmless “pseudotyped” viruses that contained the gene for the surface protein in both its ancestral and mutated form. The mutant far more easily infected human immune cells than did the ancestral pseudotype, the team reports today in Cell. The researchers also showed that the mutant more easily infects primate cells than cells from rodents or carnivores.The second paper, published today in Cell by a team led by Jonathan Ball at the United Kingdom’s University of Nottingham and Etienne Simon-Loriere of the Pasteur Institute in Paris, independently arrived at a similar conclusion. The team analyzed its own 1610 sequences from the epidemic and also found that they separated into two lineages based on the single mutation in the glycoprotein. The researchers also compared pseudotyped Ebola viruses that matched the ancestor with ones with the same mutation, and found they preferentially infected cells from humans as opposed to the fruit bat species Hypsignathus monstrosus. They also found this mutant’s infectivity was increased by other mutations, which suggests that the virus didn’t undergo just one, but several adaptations allowing it to jump more easily from human to human. That could have complicated attempts to bring the epidemic to an end.But Ball, Simon-Loriere, and colleagues approach this conclusion most cautiously, stressing that epidemiologic factors, such as “increased circulation in urban areas that in turn led to larger chains of transmission,” likely were the most important driver. “Despite the experimental data provided here, it is impossible to clearly establish whether the adaptive mutations observed were in part responsible for the extended duration of the 2013–16 epidemic,” they write in their paper.A study published by Science in March of last year did not find any evidence that the virus evolved to become more transmissible or more virulent. But the first author of that paper, virologist Thomas Hoenen of the Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Riems, Germany, says the two new papers make a powerful case that the glycoprotein mutation benefited the virus. “The question now is, what does this really mean in terms of biological consequences?”Luban stresses that Hoenen’s analysis and others that reached similar conclusions weren’t wrong. But the researchers were analyzing viral sequences to address different questions—such as the viral mutation rate—or only looked at samples isolated in the early days of the outbreak. “You have to do wet experiments sometimes,” Luban says. “All of the algorithm crunching suggested Ebola is Ebola is Ebola. These two experiments say it doesn’t matter what the computers say. The virus is more infectious.”The authors of the new studies agree that to clarify the impact the mutation has on transmissibility and virulence, scientists must do experiments with the real virus and engineered mutants of it, both in cell cultures and animals. But they have had difficulty finding a BSL-4 lab that’s willing to collaborate and funding is a challenge, too. “We need to pay attention to this,” Sabeti says. The rapid adaptation to humans underscores the need to respond quickly to animal to human transmissions of Ebola and other viruses, she adds. “Anytime you see one of these sparks ignite it could turn into full on forest fire.” The sheer size of the Ebola epidemic that began in 2013 and engulfed West Africa is still a bit of a riddle for scientists. Previous Ebola outbreaks had never sickened more than 600 people. But the outbreak in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea infected more than 28,000 before it was finally brought under control. Part of the explanation was that the virus had suddenly surfaced in major cities, making it harder to stamp out than in the isolated rural locales where it had struck before. The countries’ poor public health infrastructure and other environmental factors played roles as well.But two papers raise another intriguing possibility. They show that some 3 months after the outbreak took off and became a full-blown epidemic, the virus underwent a mutation that made it better suited for humans than for its presumed natural host, a fruit bat species. “The virus has never had this many human-to-human transmissions before, and there are a lot of mutations happening,” says Harvard University’s Pardis Sabeti, an evolutionary geneticist who co-authored one of the papers.Sabeti stresses that her team only has a “circumstantial” case about the timing of the mutation and the epidemic’s explosion, but her group and an independent team that published the second study have amassed what she calls “compelling evidence” that for the first time links a mutation in the virus to a preference for human cells. The findings “raise the possibility that this mutation contributed directly to greater transmission and thus to the severity of the outbreak,” the team writes. And they found an “association” with increased mortality. “We should neither be alarmist nor complacent,” Sabeti says. “Any possibility that one of the mutations can have a serious impact should be interrogated.” Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. 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